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A Nonprofit 501 (c) (3) Organization and Public Charity

PO Box 11037 Lexington KY 40512-1037

859.299.0547 Voice     859.233.1999 Fax

   www.AMoralChallenge.us    www.wtwav.us    info@wtwav.us

 

Our Mission: To bring about a substantial reduction in violence through education.

 

Our Model: People voluntarily using the power of their unique, personal, individual, one-of-a-kind, identity while never compromising any of our good, common, fundamental, principles.

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Welcome to the Official Home Page of the National Campaign of

 

Win The War! Against Violence - The 2014 TEN PERCENT Challenge

 

"A Moral Challenge" 

"America's National Youth Violence Prevention TEN PERCENT Challenge"

A Violence Reduction Challenge and Violence Prevention Public Awareness and Educational Campaign


This campaign encourages and challenges all youths in the United States, ages 12 to 24, to Voluntarily reduce all unjustified violence in America by TEN PERCENT in 2014 and every subsequent year. 


This Campaign is a active and UNITED attempt to reverse some negative trends of violence in the U.S. It is an effort which all youths can participate in, and all will benefit from. This campaign is educational only, is not political, financial, religious or judgmental. It also does not require any legislation or state or federal funding or enforcement and no other issues are involved. This “Youth Challenge”  provides an important and crystal-clear message to our youth that “Unjustified Violence Against Other People Is NOT ACCEPTABLE In America.”

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Mixed messages to America’s youth? Not anymore in regard to violence. A new challenge has united American’s a crystal-clear message to our youth, “Unjustified Violence Against Other People Is NOT ACCEPTABLE In America.  This campaign is called  Win The War! Against Violence - The 2013 TEN PERCENT Challenge  “A Moral Challenge. It is an educational only initiative and challenges all America youths ages 12 to 24 to reduce all violence voluntarily TEN PERCENT in 2013 and every subsequent year after that. Peace is coming up America. Did you get the message?


I Accept & Support This TEN PERCENT Challenge!


Acknowledge your participation and support of this “Challenge”. Send us an email which will say you support the Win The War! Against Violence - The 2013 TEN PERCENT Challenge for the U.S.A. Click on the email address below to send. No Charge! Feel free to add any comments you may have. Your support and comments could appear on our upcoming TEN PERCENT Challenge Support Page.

IAccept@AMoralChallnege.us

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Why Join & Support this National Challenge?

Violence in the U.S. remains at an unacceptably high level. Violence negatively affects each and every one of us regardless of position or beliefs. Violence reduces the quality of life for victims of violence. Violence interferes with a student’s education and interferes with a educator’s ability to teach. Violence creates unnecessary costs to individuals, families, businesses, towns municipalities, cities and states within the U.S. It disproportionately impacts youth, especially minorities. All of the 313 million people in the U.S. would benefit from a TEN PERCENT reduction in violence in 2013 and every subsequent year thereafter; especially the 77 million children (ages 0-17) which is 25 percent of America’s population. We recognize “Win The War! Against Violence - The 2013 TEN PERCENT Challenge America’s National Youth Violence Prevention Challenge A Moral Challenge (www.AMoralChallenge.us) as a worthy effort and strongly encourage youth to voluntarily and substantially reduce all forms of unjustified violence in their lives.


Even More Reasons Why You Should Support this Challenge! It's Free. It exposes the too high level of violence in the United States of America. It asks and Challenges all in the U.S.A. to do "No Violence" and reduce "Shadow Violence"  (accidental injuries) in 2013 and every subsequent year. Everything about this Challenge is 100 Percent Voluntary. This Campaign is Educational only and about Violence Reduction only and Violence Prevention Education has been proven to help. It is not Political, Financial, Religious or Judgmental in nature but does not conflict with any of those belief. Every one in America is equal in this Challenge no matter what their status or position is. A reduction of violence will result in cost savings to local, state and federal government agencies, businesses and individuals. Less violence will allow for faster advancement in other important areas like medicine and poverty. Less violence will improve the quality of life for all Americans and help reduce the pain and suffering, substance abuse problems and mental health problems. Not doing violence gives you more independence and more control of your life. No one in the U.S. is safe from violence. This Challenge is only about real violence and not fake or simulated violence. This Challenge reaffirms everyone's Natural or God Given Right to live in Peace. This is a call to non-action. You do not have to do anything for this Campaign, except stop yourself when you want to, or are about to, do violence to yourself or others. And no violence and fun equals "Super Fun"! But the best reason for supporting this Challenge is our individual and collective survival!
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Violence in the U.S. remains at an unacceptably high level. Violence negatively affects each and every one of us regardless of position or beliefs. Violence reduces the quality of life for victims of violence. Violence interferes with a student’s education and interferes with a educator’s ability to teach. Violence creates unnecessary costs to individuals, families, businesses, towns municipalities, cities and states within the U.S. It disproportionately impacts youth, especially minorities. All of the 313 million people in the U.S. would benefit from a Ten Percent reduction in violence in 2013 and every subsequent year thereafter;  especially the 77 million children (ages 0-17) which is 25 percent of America’s population. We recognize “Win The War! Against Violence - The 2013 TEN PERCENT Challenge America’s National Youth Violence Prevention Challenge A Moral Challenge (www.AMoralChallenge.us) as a worthy effort and strongly encourage youth to voluntarily and substantially reduce all forms of unjustified violence in their lives.


Even More Reasons Why You Should Support this Campaign! It's Free. It exposes the too high level of violence in the United States of America. It asks and Challenges all in the U.S.A. to do "No Violence" and reduce "Shadow Violence"  (accidental injuries) in 2013 and every subsequent year. Everything about this Challenge is 100 Percent Voluntary. This Campaign is Educational only and about Violence Reduction only and Violence Prevention Education has been proven to help. It is not Political, Financial, Religious or Judgmental in nature but does not conflict with any of those belief. Every one in America is equal in this Challenge no matter what their status or position is. A reduction of violence will result in cost savings to local, state and federal government agencies, businesses and individuals. Less violence will allow for faster advancement in other important areas like medicine and poverty. Less violence will improve the quality of life for all Americans and help reduce the pain and suffering, substance abuse problems and mental health problems. Not doing violence gives you more independence and more control of your life. No one in the U.S. is safe from violence. This Challenge is only about real violence and not fake or simulated violence. This Challenge reaffirms everyone's Natural or God Given Right to live in Peace. This is a call to non-action. You do not have to do anything for this Campaign, except stop yourself when you want to, or are about to, do violence to yourself or others. And no violence and fun equals "Super Fun"! But the best reason for supporting this Challenge is our individual and collective survival!
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OUR FREE "MORAL" EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS & INITIATIVES"

 

Win The War! Against Violence "A Moral Challenge"  A Youth Violence Prevention Ten Percent Challenge   USA   KY
 
"A Moral Kid" - A Youth Violence Prevention Live Outreach Presentation Ages 12 - 17
 
A Moral Guy" , "A Moral Man" "Moral Men of Service" -  College Age and Adult Violence Prevention Live Outreach Presentations
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Download our free App for iphone, ipad and android: WTWAV           Apple Itunes Store        Google Play      
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USA Quick Links > >    Help Spread the Word    Help With a Donation    Join our Mailing List    A Moral Kid  

 

Calendar    Volunteer    Feedback    Poster

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Quotes


"We should leave no stone unturned and recognize that we have no greater mission as a country than keeping our young people safe.U.S. President Barak Obama (July 2012)   http://politicalticker.blogs.cnn.com/2012/07/25/obama-takes-on-gun-violence-in-new-orleans-speech/


We want a peaceful planet. We want people to be able to enjoy their lives and know they're going to have a bright and prosperous future, not be at war. That's our purpose.” Former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney (October 2012).  http://dyn.politico.com/printstory.cfm?uuid=5CD244F1-FC4F-E954-E0552D4AAAEE55CA


Clearly we the people have to take a touch look at our violent society and find some effective solutions without  violating constitutional rights. A very difficult situation but  we have to try.” Bill O’Reilly, News Commentator, What do we do about violent evil? (December 2012 Fox)  http://video.foxnews.com/v/2041693820001/


“We must effectively deal with the rise of violence in our country.”“And the truth is every problem can't be solved by government. Many are caused by the moral breakdown in our society.” U.S. Senator Marco Rubio - GOP response to President Obama's State of the Union address (January 2013 NPR) http://www.npr.org/2013/02/12/171841996/transcript-gop-response-to-state-of-the-union-address

 

"We realize this requires all the stakeholders to give us their best ideas to what is, as I said at the outset, a complicated problem. There is no single answer."  U.S. Vice President Joseph Biden, Jr. (January 2013 CNN) http://www.wptv.com/dpp/news/political/nra-joe-biden-meeting-national-rifle-association-blasts-biden-after-gun-task-force-meeting


And it is about values.”“And I don't buy this case where people say they don't have values. They do have values. They have the wrong values.Rahm Emanuel, Mayor, Chicago Illinois. (July 2012 CBS) http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-18563_162-57468987/emanuel-chicagos-escalating-crime-about-values/?tag=cbsnewsSectionContent.0

 

You can’t legislate morality” Wayne LaPierre CEO and Executive Vice President , National Rifle Association.  (December 2012 NBC) http://www.nbcumv.com/mediavillage/networks/nbcnews/pressreleases?pr=contents/press-releases/2012/12/23/meetthepresscli1356284286434.xml

 “Violence is a big problem. Too many children are dying.  Too many children. We must do something.” Gabrielle Giffords Former U.S. Representative (January 2013 U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee)      http://americansforresponsiblesolutions.org/video/


..We’re abdicating the ideology arena and we need to get back into it.  We have the best values we have the best narrative. Most people in the world just to have a good decent life that is supported by a good decent job and raise their family. We need to get in there and compete and we can do it successfully.” Hillary Rodham Clinton, Secretary of State, Opening Remarks Before the House Foreign Affairs Committee Washington, DC, January 23, 2013   http://www.c-spanvideo.org/program/310545-1    


I think you need people of principle, of character, that are leaders, that take stands on important tough issues that will affect the future of this country.” http://thinkexist.com/quotes/sean_hannity/4.html

 

“Many who live with violence day in and day out assume that it is a intrinsic part of the human condition. But this is not so. Violence can be prevented. Violent culture can be turned around. Governments, communities and individuals can make a difference.” Nelson Mandela (2002)

 http://www.who.int/violence_injury_prevention/violence/global_campaign/gcvp_plan_of_action.pdf

 

“We forget that despite the superficial differences between us, people are equal in their basic wish for peace and happiness.” Dalai Lama (Jan 2013) https://twitter.com/DalaiLama/status/288955726779535360


The bottom line is clear: Solutions to America’s challenges are being developed every day at the grass roots – and government shouldn’t be supplanting those efforts, it should be supporting those efforts.” President Barak Obama June 30, 2009 http://www.whitehouse.gov/administration/eop/sicp

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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)


“Homicide was the second leading cause of death for young people ages 10 to 24 years old.” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) - Youth Violence – Facts at a Glance (2010).  http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/pdf/yv-datasheet-a.pdf

 

In this age group (Ages 15 to 24 years old) homicide is the number one cause of death among African Americans...” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) - Preventing Youth Violence – Program Activities Guide (2009).  http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/pdf/PreventingYV-a.pdf


"Intimate partner violence, rape, stalking – all of these forms of violence can create toxic stress on the body that is long-lasting and cumulative, and can negatively impact a person's health and well-being for the rest of their life." Dr. Howard Spivak, Director, Violence Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/nisvs/2010_report.html

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Criminal Victimization in the U.S. (age 12 or older)

U.S. Dept. Of Justice (DOJ), Office of Justice Program (OJP), Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) , National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS)

 "In 2011, U.S. residents age 12 or older experienced an estimated 5.8 million violent victimizations and 17.1 million property victimizations. Between 2010 and 2011, the overall victimization rate for violent crime increased 17%,from 19.3 to 22.5 victimizations per 1,000 persons age 12 or older." (2011 Report) (2010 Report) (2009 Report)

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Homicide Trends in the U.S.

U.S. Dept. of Justice (DOJ), Office of Justice Programs (OJP), Bureau of Justice Statstics (BJS)

"From 1980 to 2008, young adults (18 to 24 years old) have consistently had the highest offending rate."


 "In 2008, young adults (18 to 24 years old) experienced the highest homicide victimization rate (13.4 homicides per 100,000)."


 "Approximately a third (34%) of murder victims and almost half (49%) of the offenders were under age 25."


 "Males represented 77% of homicide victims and nearly 90% of offenders."


 "Blacks were disproportionately represented as both homicide victims and offenders. Th e victimization rate for blacks (27.8 per 100,000) was 6 times higher than the rate for whites (4.5 per 100,000)."


"Most murders were intraracial. From 1980 through 2008— 84% of white victims were killed by whites. 93% of black victims were killed by blacks."


"Most justifiable homicides were intraracial. In incidents involving citizens, three-quarters involved citizens and felons of the same race. In incidents involving police, two-thirds involved police officers and felons of the same race."


"Gang violence accounted for 1% of all homicides in 1980 and 6% of all homicides in 2008."


 "The proportion of homicides in which the victim/offender relationships were unknown increased from 36% of all

homicides in 1980 to 44% in 2008. Among homicides for which the victim/offender relationships were known, 22% of victims were killed by strangers."


"Homicide offending patterns were generally similar to victimization patterns."



“Homicide is of interest not only because of its severity, but also because it is a fairly reliable barometer for all violent crime. At the national level no other crime is measured as accurately.” U.S. Department of Justice - Homicide Trends in the United States (1999). (1999 Report)


"We cannot just arrest people and think we are going to have a safe community." "So our approach to this problem has to be 360 degrees." “I have spent my career working on urban violence issues in relative obscurity.” “My career working on this issue has shown me that there is no single factor that drives this. This s is a complicated problem. It's a factor of educational opportunity ,economic opportunity, healthcare. It’s a comprehensive situation that breeds violence.” “It’s a bit a of an alchemy to try to come up with a single factor that is most determinant with respect to reducing the levels of violent crime” U.S. Attorney, Department of Justice, U.S. Timothy J. Heaphy – United State Attorney for the Western District of Virginia, United States Department of Justice . Confirmed by U.S. Senate in 2009. February, 12, 2013 http://www.senate.gov/isvp/comm=judiciary&type=live&filename=judiciary021213

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Prisoners in the U.S. (age 18 or older)

U.S. Dept. of Justice (DOJ), Office of Justice Programs (OJP), Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS)

uring 2011, the number of prisoners 
under the jurisdiction of state and federal 
correctional authorities declined by 0.9%, 
from 1,613,803 to 1,598,780 
uring 2011, the number of prisoners 
under the jurisdiction of state and federal 
correctional authorities declined by 0.9%, 
from 1,613,803 to 1,598,780 
uring 2011, the number of prisoners 
under the jurisdiction of state and federal 
correctional authorities declined by 0.9%, 
from 1,613,803 to 1,598,780 
uring 2011, the number of prisoners 
under the jurisdiction of state and federal 
correctional authorities declined by 0.9%, 
from 1,613,803 to 1,598,780 
uring 2011, the number of prisoners 
under the jurisdiction of state and federal 
correctional authorities declined by 0.9%, 
from 1,613,803 to 1,598,780
uring 2011, the number of prisoners 
under the jurisdiction of state and federal 
correctional authorities declined by 0.9%, 
from 1,613,803 to 1,598,780 
uring 2011, the number of prisoners 
under the jurisdiction of state and federal 
correctional authorities declined by 0.9%, 
from 1,613,803 to 1,598,780 
uring 2011, the number of prisoners 
under the jurisdiction of state and federal 
correctional authorities declined by 0.9%, 
from 1,613,803 to 1,598,780 

"During 2011, the number of prisoners under the jurisdiction of state and federal correctional authorities declined by 0.9%, from 1,613,803 to 1,598,780." (2011 Report) (2010 Report) (2009 Report)

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Adult Correctional Populations in the U.S.

U.S. Dept. Of Justice (DOJ), Office of Justice Programs (OJP), Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS)

"There were 6.98 million offenders under the supervision of the adult correctional systems at year end 2011, a decrease of more than 98,900 offenders during the year." (2011 Report) (2010 Report) (2009 Report)

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here were 6.98 million offenders 
under the supervision of the adult 
correctional systems at yearend 2011, a 
decrease
here were 6.98 million offenders 
under the supervision of the adult 
correctional systems at yearend 2011, a 
decrease
Juveniles In Residential Placement in the U.S.

US. Dept of Justice (DOJ), Office of Justice Programs (OJP), Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP)

YEAR        12 or younger     13         14         15            16             17       18 to 20      TOTAL

2006                     1,206     3,419     9,113     17,552     24,606     23,716     13,109       92,721

2007                       979      2,844     7,621     15,565     23,091     23,193     13,521       86,814

2010                       693      2,079     5,955     12,604     19,540     19,990       9,931       70,792

Suggested Citation: Sickmund, M., Sladky, T.J., Kang, W., & Puzzanchera, C. (2011). "Easy Access to the Census of Juveniles in Residential Placement." Available: http://www.ojjdp.gov/ojstatbb/ezacjrp/                 
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"It’s clear – as we come together today – that too many Americans go to too many prisons for far too long, and for no truly good law enforcement reason.  It’s clear, at a basic level, that 20th-century criminal justice solutions are not adequate to overcome our 21st-century challenges.  And it is well past time to implement common sense changes that will foster safer communities from coast to coast." U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder, August 12, 2013  http://www.justice.gov/iso/opa/ag/speeches/2013/ag-speech-130812.html

Time To Dial Back Violence In the U.S.A.

Win The War! Against Violence - The 2013 Ten Percent Challenge is a violence reduction and a violence education and awareness campaign by the nonprofit organization Win The War! Against Violence. It is a challenge to everyone in the USA to voluntarily reduce all forms of violence Ten Percent in 2013.

 

It is also a competition where States compete against each other to see who can reduce the greatest percentage of violent victimizations per calendar year. For those that Win The War! Against Violence the best will receive a official trophy.

 

For the State vs. State competition portion of the Campaign, the winners will be the top three in 4 categories. Categories are by State Populations and are labeled Red, Orange, Green and Blue. Statistics come from the FBI's Uniform Crimes Reports (UCR) which track crimes reported to police. Later in 2013 this campaign goes to countries worldwide!

Resolution Template (USA) -    MS Word    PDF

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There may be times when Win The War! Against Violence offers particular viewpoints. But it does not merely present a view point, it also intends to offer sufficiently full and fair exposition of pertinent facts to permit an individual or the public to form and independent opinion or conclusion.
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Win The War! Against Violence - The 2013 Ten Percent Challenge

 

States vs. States  - A "Civil" Civil War.

 

FBI UCR statistics only, violent victimizations. 18,000 Sources Reporting.

 

 

2010/1995 Link    2010/2009 Link    2009/2008 Link      2008/2007 Link     2007/2006 Link    2006/2005 Link 

 

2005/2004 Link    2004/2003 Link    2003/2002 Link      2002/2001 Link     2001/2000 Link    2000/1999 Link

 

 

Level I - Population over 10,000,000 (Red) (7 States)

 

 State                     2008         2009    Change %  Rank/2009  Pop/2009    2010    Ch. %    Rank/2010

 

California              185,173      174,459        (5.8)     3           36,961,664      164,133      (5.9)

 

Florida                  126,260       113,541     (10.1)     1           18,537,969      101,969  (10.19)         2

 

Illinois                    67,840         64,185        (5.4)                  12,910,409       55,835    (13.00)         1

 

New York               77,546         75,176        (3.1)                 19,541,453        75,977       1.06

 

Ohio                       40,342         38,332         (5.0)                 11,542,645       36,366      (5.12)

  

Pennsylvania         51,050         47,965        (6.0)     2          12,604,767        46,514      (3.02)

 

Texas                   123,586        121,668       (1.6)                 24,782,302     113,231       (6.93)           3

       

 

Level II - Population Between 5,000,000 and 10,000,00 (Orange) (15 States)

 

 State                       2008          2009    Change %   Rank/09   2009 Pop.    2010   Ch. %    Rank/2010

 

Arizona                    31,274          26,919    (13.9)       1        6,595,778        26,085     (3.09)

 

Colorado                 17,129          16,976       (0.9)                  5,024,748       16,133      (4.96)

 

Georgia                   47,461         41,880    (11.8)        3       9,829,211        39,072      (6.70)

 

Indiana                   21,520          21,404       (0.5)                  6,423,113        20,389     (4.74)

 

Maryland                35,385          33,623        (5.0)                 5,699,478        31,620     (5.95)

 

Massachusetts      29,888           30,136         0.8                    6,593,587       30,553      1.38

 

Michigan                51,384           49,547        (3.6)                 9,969,727        48,460     (2.19)

 

Minnesota             13,771           12,842        (6.7)                  5,266,214       12,515      (2.54)

 

Missouri                 29,771          29,444        (0.9)                 5,987,580        27,252      (7.44)           2

 

New Jersey            28,351           27,121       (4.3)                 8,707,739       27,055      (0.24)

 

North Carolina        43,120          37,929   (12.0)       2        9,380,884        34,653      (8.63)           1

 

Tennessee             44,968           42,041      (6.5)                   6,296,254       38,921      (7.42)           3

 

Virginia                 20,038           17,879    (10.8)                  7,882,590       17,087      (4.42)

 

Washington          21,739           22,056        1.5                     6,664,195       21,101      (4.32)

 

Wisconsin             15,499           14,533       (6.2)                 5,654,774         14,142      (2.69)

 

 

Level III - Population 2,000,000 to 5,000,000 (Green) (14 States)

 

State                        2008         2009    Change %   Rank   2009 Pop.      2010    Ch. %      Rank/2010

 

Alabama                    21,109        21,179         0.3                 4,708,708        18,056     (14.74)       1

 

Arkansas                  14,472        14,959         3.4                  2,889,450        14,735       (1.49)

 

Connecticut             10,737         10,508        (2.1)                3,518,288         10,057      (4.29)

 

Iowa                         8,651           8,397        (2.9)                 3,007,856           8,333      (0.76)

 

Kansas                   11,586          11,278        (2.7)                 2,818,747         10,531      (6.62)

 

Kentucky                12,812          11,159    (12.9)      1         4,314,113         10,528      (5.65)

 

Louisana                29,576          27,849       (5.8)                  4,492,076         24,866   (10.71)        2

 

Mississippi               8,952            8,304        (7.2)      2          2,951,996          8,003      (3.62)

 

New Mexico           13,010           12,440       (4.4)                 2,009,671         12,126      (2.52)

 

Nevada                  18,917          18,559        (1.9)                  2,643,085        17,841       (3.86)

 

Oklahoma               19,214         18,474       (4.0)                   3,687,050        17,987       (2.63)

 

Oregon                    9,843            9,744       (1.0)                   3,825,657          9,655       (0.91)

 

South Carolina        32,752         30,596       (6.6)       3         4,561,242        27,648       (9.63)        3

 

Utah                       6,130              5,924       (3.4)                   2,784,572         5,879        (0.14)

 

 

Level IV - Population Under 2,000,000 (14 States & D.C.)

 

State                        2008         2009    Change %   Rank   2009 Pop.      2010     Ch. %   Rank/2010

 

Alaska                        4,479         4,421          (1.3)                  698,473       4,537        2.62

        

Delaware                  6,187           5,635        (8.9)     3            885,122       5,575      (1.06)           3

 

District of Col.           8,509           8,071        (5.1)                   599,657       8,004     (0.83)

    

Hawaii                       3,510           3,559         1.4                  1,295,178      3,574        0.42

  

Idaho                        3,678           3,530        (4.0)                 1,545,801       3,465      (1.84)           2

 

Maine                       1,572            1,579         0.4                  1,318,301       1,621        2.66

 

Montana                  2,918            2,473      (15.3)     2           974,989       2,693        8.89

 

Nebraska                 5,537            5,059        (8.6)                 1,796,619      5,104        0.89

 

New Hampshire       2,127            2,114        (0.6)                 1,324,575     2,198         3.97

 

North Dakota           1,216            1,298         6.7                     646,844      1,513       16.56

 

Rhode Island           2,656            2,660          0.2                 1,053,209      2,701         1.54

 

South Dakota           2,221           1,508     (32.1)       1          812,383      2,186       44.96

 

Vermont                    854                 817       (4.3)                     621,760        815       (0.24)

 

West Virginia          5,027            5,396          7.3                 1,819,777       5,830        8.04

 

Wyoming                1,312             1,242        (5.3)                   544,270       1,104    (11.11)           1

 

 

United Sates**  1,392,629   1,318398    (5.3)        307,006,550   1,246,248     (6.0)

 

5 Sates - 10 % or More Reduction 2009-2010.    8 States - 10 % or More Reduction 2008-2009

 

 

Summary % Change Violent Crime U.S. (UCR)

 

2010:  -6.0    2009:  -5.3    2008:  -1.9      2007:   -.7     2006:  +1.9     2005:  +2.3   

 

2004:  -1.2    2003:  -3.0    2002:   0.0     2001: +2.1     2000:   -.02

 

 

** Populations are U.S. Census Bureau provisional estimates as of July 1, 2009, and July 1, 2008.

Limited data for 2008 and 2009 were available for Illinois. See Data Declaration.

The data collection methodology for the offense of forcible rape used by the Illinois and the Minnesota state

UCR Programs (with the exception of Rockford, IL, and Minneapolis and St. Paul, MN) does not comply with

national UCR guidelines. Consequently, their state figures for forcible rape (with the exception of Rockford, IL,

and Minneapolis and St. Paul, MN) have been estimated for inclusion in this table.

Because of changes in the state's reporting practices, figures are not comparable to previous years' data.

Includes offenses reported by the Zoological Police and the Metro Transit Police.

 

Notes from waragainstviolence.org:  Statistics are only what is reported to police age 12 or older. Less then 50% of crimes are reported to the police.

Win The War! (against violence) (c) 2011

                                                       The Nation's Two Crime Measures

                                          Bureau of Justice Statistics    http://bjs.ojp.usdoj.gov/

  • BJS's National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS)- reported and unreported crime from the victim's perspective.
  • FBI's Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) - crimes reported by law enforcement.
Like many other indicators used to assess conditions in the United States, these two indicators of crime complement each other to produce a more comprehensive portrait of the nation's crime problem.Some of the differences between UCR and NCVS are -
  UCR NCVS
Geographic coverage National & State estimates, local agency reports National estimates
Collection method Reports by law enforcement to the FBI on a monthly basis Survey of as many as 77,200 households and 134,000 individuals age 12 or older.
Measures Index crimes* reported by law enforcement Reported and unreported crime; details about the crimes, victims, and offenders
 *seven serious crimes. For more information about the purposes and advantages of the UCR and the NCVS, see The Nation's Two Crime Measures.

_________________________________________________________________________________________

The Future of Crime Reporting is NIBRS - National Incident-Based Reporting System  

 

FBI Link       NACJD Link      South Dakota Link

 

__________________________________________________________________________________

Violent Crime - UCR

Uniform Crime Reporting Link

Definition

In the FBI's Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program, violent crime is composed of four offenses: murder and nonnegligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. Violent crimes are defined in the UCR Program as those offenses which involve force or threat of force.


Data collection

The data presented in Crime in the United States reflect the Hierarchy Rule, which requires that only the most serious offense in a multiple-offense criminal incident be counted. The descending order of UCR violent crimes are murder and nonnegligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery, and aggravated assault, followed by the property crimes of burglary, larceny-theft, and motor vehicle theft. Although arson is also a property crime, the Hierarchy Rule does not apply to the offense of arson.

 

Each year when Crime in the United States is published, some entities use reported figures to compile rankings of cities and counties. These rough rankings provide no insight into the numerous variables that mold crime in a particular town, city, county, state, or region. Consequently, they lead to simplistic and/or incomplete analyses that often create misleading perceptions adversely affecting communities and their residents. Valid assessments are possible only with careful study and analysis of the range of unique conditions affecting each local law enforcement jurisdiction. The data user is, therefore, cautioned against comparing statistical data of individual reporting units from cities, metropolitan areas, states, or colleges or universities solely on the basis of their population coverage or student enrollment.


Additional Information.

 

 

Notes about the Uniform Crime Report from wav.org. The UCR includes violence crimes reported to the police only. According to the FBI over 50% of crimes are not reported. Also not included in the UCR are children 11 or younger, suicides, accidents, missing persons or military deaths or injuries.

_____________________________________________________________

First Set of Violence Statistics and Injury in the United States Per Year.

(These Numbers are the lower of the Two Sets Presented)

Columns:

1) Year

2) Number of Violent Offenses United States (FBI UCR - Reported to Police) Ages 12 and older)

3) Suicides (CDC)

4) Self-harm All Injury Causes Nonfatal Injuries (CDC)

5) Unintentional Injury Deaths (includes terrorism but does not included homicide or military deaths) (CDC)

6) Unintentional All Injury Causes Nonfatal Injuries (CDC)

7) Legal Intervention Injury Deaths (CDC)

8) Military Injury and Deaths (U.S. Dept. Of Defence and Various other Sources)

9) Missing Persons and Unidentified Remains (FBI National Crime Information Center Missing Person and Unidentified Person Statistics at Year End).   Link

10) Child Maltreatment (U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services - Age 0-17)

11) Child Maltreament (U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services - % of Victims Age 12-17)

 

  1            2           3            4            5              6            7         8            9             10      11

 

2003  1,383,676   31,484    411,128    91,545    27,127,477   423     3,928          N/A    906,000  16.60

2004  1,360,088   32,439    425,650    94,655    27,436,649   372   10,090          N/A    872,000  15.40

2005  1,390,745   32,637    372,722    99,685    27,156,734   414     8,152    103,768    899,000  16.40

2006  1,418,043   33,300    395,276   103,026   27,671,499   434     8,695    110,484    905,000  16.50

2007  1,408,337   34,598    395,320   105,345   27,731,818   412     8,815    105,229    794,000  24.60

2008  1,392,629      N/A     376,306      N/A      27,877,748   N/A     4,285    102,764    772,000  24.40

2009  1,318,398      N/A     374,486      N/A      27,632,781   N/A     3,342      96,192    763,000  24.10

 

 

First Set Summary

Total of death or injury in the U.S. Per Year intentional or unintentional which also includes U.S. Military Service members. Also included are missing people in the U.S. as well as unidentified remains. Total consists of first 10 Columns.

 

Year                 Total                      U.S. Population (FBI UCR)

 

2003            30,062,787                          290,788,976

2004            30,339,069                          293,656,842

2005            30,063,857                          296,410,404

2006            30,645,757                          299,398,484

2007            30,583,874                          301,621,157

2008            30,664,288                          304,374,846

2009            30,326,755                          307,006,550

 

 

For numbers that we unavailable, averages were take from the previous two years or if that was not available from the two subsequent years.

_______________________________________________________________________________________

Estimated Violent Crime in the United States

Totals per year - UCR only (FBI UCR Data Tool) Link

 

Year Population National or state crime
Violent crime
Violent crime total Murder and nonnegligent manslaughter Forcible rape Robbery Aggravated assault
 
1960 179,323,175 288,460 9,110 17,190 107,840 154,320
1961 182,992,000 289,390 8,740 17,220 106,670 156,760
1962 185,771,000 301,510 8,530 17,550 110,860 164,570
1963 188,483,000 316,970 8,640 17,650 116,470 174,210
1964 191,141,000 364,220 9,360 21,420 130,390 203,050
1965 193,526,000 387,390 9,960 23,410 138,690 215,330
1966 195,576,000 430,180 11,040 25,820 157,990 235,330
1967 197,457,000 499,930 12,240 27,620 202,910 257,160
1968 199,399,000 595,010 13,800 31,670 262,840 286,700
1969 201,385,000 661,870 14,760 37,170 298,850 311,090
1970 203,235,298 738,820 16,000 37,990 349,860 334,970
1971 206,212,000 816,500 17,780 42,260 387,700 368,760
1972 208,230,000 834,900 18,670 46,850 376,290 393,090
1973 209,851,000 875,910 19,640 51,400 384,220 420,650
1974 211,392,000 974,720 20,710 55,400 442,400 456,210
1975 213,124,000 1,039,710 20,510 56,090 470,500 492,620
1976 214,659,000 1,004,210 18,780 57,080 427,810 500,530
1977 216,332,000 1,029,580 19,120 63,500 412,610 534,350
1978 218,059,000 1,085,550 19,560 67,610 426,930 571,460
1979 220,099,000 1,208,030 21,460 76,390 480,700 629,480
1980 225,349,264 1,344,520 23,040 82,990 565,840 672,650
1981 229,465,714 1,361,820 22,520 82,500 592,910 663,900
1982 231,664,458 1,322,390 21,010 78,770 553,130 669,480
1983 233,791,994 1,258,087 19,308 78,918 506,567 653,294
1984 235,824,902 1,273,282 18,692 84,233 485,008 685,349
1985 237,923,795 1,327,767 18,976 87,671 497,874 723,246
1986 240,132,887 1,489,169 20,613 91,459 542,775 834,322
1987 242,288,918 1,483,999 20,096 91,111 517,704 855,088
1988 244,498,982 1,566,221 20,675 92,486 542,968 910,092
1989 246,819,230 1,646,037 21,500 94,504 578,326 951,707
1990 249,464,396 1,820,127 23,438 102,555 639,271 1,054,863
1991 252,153,092 1,911,767 24,703 106,593 687,732 1,092,739
1992 255,029,699 1,932,274 23,760 109,062 672,478 1,126,974
1993 257,782,608 1,926,017 24,526 106,014 659,870 1,135,607
1994 260,327,021 1,857,670 23,326 102,216 618,949 1,113,179
1995 262,803,276 1,798,792 21,606 97,470 580,509 1,099,207
1996 265,228,572 1,688,540 19,645 96,252 535,594 1,037,049
1997 267,783,607 1,636,096 18,208 96,153 498,534 1,023,201
1998 270,248,003 1,533,887 16,974 93,144 447,186 976,583
1999 272,690,813 1,426,044 15,522 89,411 409,371 911,740
2000 281,421,906 1,425,486 15,586 90,178 408,016 911,706
2001 285,317,559 1,439,480 16,037 90,863 423,557 909,023
2002 287,973,924 1,423,677 16,229 95,235 420,806 891,407
2003 290,788,976 1,383,676 16,528 93,883 414,235 859,030
2004 293,656,842 1,360,088 16,148 95,089 401,470 847,381
2005 296,507,061 1,390,745 16,740 94,347 417,438 862,220
2006 299,398,484 1,418,043 17,030 92,757 447,403 860,853
2007 301,621,157 1,408,337 16,929 90,427 445,125 855,856
2008 304,374,846 1,392,629 16,442 90,479 443,574 842,134
2009 307,006,550 1,318,398 15,241 88,097 408,217 806,843

Notes:

National or state offense totals are based on data from all reporting agencies and estimates for unreported areas.

  
  • United States-Total -
    • The 168 murder and nonnegligent homicides that occurred as a result of the bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City in 1995 are included in the national estimate.
    • The 2,823 murder and nonnegligent homicides that occurred as a result of the events of September 11, 2001, are not included in the national estimates.
  • Sources: FBI, Uniform Crime Reports as prepared by the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data

    Page last revised on March 29, 2010

    _________________________________________________________________________________________

    Terms & Definitions (UCR & NVCS)  Link

     

    Aggravated assault

    An attack or attempted attack with a weapon, regardless of whether an injury occurred, and an attack without a weapon when serious injury results.

    With injury - An attack without a weapon when serious injury results or an attack with a weapon involving any injury. Serious injury includes broken bones, lost teeth, internal injuries, loss of consciousness, and any unspecified injury requiring two or more days of hospitalization.

    Threatened with a weapon - Threat or attempted attack by an offender armed with a gun, knife, or other object used as a weapon that does not result in victim injury.

     
    Assault An unlawful physical attack or threat of attack. Assaults may be classified as aggravated or simple. Rape, attempted rape, and sexual assaults are excluded from this category, as well as robbery and attempted robbery. The severity of assaults ranges from minor threats to nearly fatal incidents.
     
    Rape Forced sexual intercourse including both psychological coercion as well as physical force. Forced sexual intercourse means vaginal, anal or oral penetration by the offender (s). This category also includes incidents where the penetration is from a foreign object such as a bottle. Includes attempted rapes, male as well as female victims, and both heterosexual and homosexual rape. Attempted rape includes verbal threats of rape.
     
    Robbery

    Completed or attempted theft, directly from a person, of property or cash by force or threat of force, with or without a weapon, and with or without injury.

    Completed/property taken - The successful taking of property from a person by force or threat of force, with or without a weapon, and with or without injury.

    Completed with injury - The successful taking of property from a person, accompanied by an attack, either with or without a weapon, resulting in injury.

    Completed without injury - The successful taking of property from a person by force or the threat of force, either with or without a weapon, but not resulting in injury.

    Attempted to take property - The attempt to take property from a person by force or threat of force without success, with or without a weapon, and with or without injury.

    Attempted without injury - The attempt to take property from a person by force or the threat of force without success, either with or without a weapon, but not resulting in injury.

    Attempted with injury - The attempt to take property from a person without success, accompanied by an attack, either with or without a weapon, resulting in injury.

     
    Violence, crimes of Rape, sexual assault, personal robbery or assault. This category includes both attempted and completed crimes. It does not include purse snatching and pocket picking. Murder is not measured by the NCVS because of an inability to question the victim. Completed violence - The sum of all completed rapes, sexual assaults, robberies, and assaults. See individual crime types for definition of completed crimes. Attempted/threatened violence - The unsuccessful attempt of rape, sexual assault, personal robbery or assault. Includes attempted attacks or sexual assaults by means of verbal threats. See individual crime types for definition of attempted crimes.

    __________________________________________________________________________________________________

    Violent Crime - NCVS

    The National Crime Victimization Survey U.S.  Link

     

    NCVS is the Nation's primary source of information on criminal victimization. Each year, data are obtained from a nationally representative sample of 76,000 households comprising nearly 135,300 persons on the frequency, characteristics and consequences of criminal victimization in the United States. The survey enables BJS to estimate the likelihood of victimization by rape, sexual assault, robbery, assault, theft, household burglary, and motor vehicle theft for the population as a whole as well as for segments of the population such as women, the elderly, members of various racial groups, city dwellers, or other groups. The NCVS provides the largest national forum for victims to

    NCVS Violent Crime

     

    Notes from wav.org on the NCVS. Statistics does not include homicide. Does not included children 11 or younger. in 2009 the UCR violent victimization number was 30% less then the 2009 NCVS violent victimization number.

    _______________________________________________________________

     

    Second Set of Violence Statistics and Injury in the United States Per Year.

    (These Numbers are the higher of the Two Sets Presented)

    Columns:

    1) Year

    2) Number of Violent Offenses United States (NCVS)

    3) Suicides (CDC) U.S.

    4) Self-harm All Injury Causes Nonfatal Injuries (CDC) U.S.

    5) Unintentional Injury Deaths (inlcudes terroism but does not inluded homicide or miltary deaths) (CDC) U.S.

    6) Unintentional All Injury Causes Nonfatal Injuries (CDC) U.S.

    7) Military Injury and Deaths (U.S. Dept. Of Defence and Various other Sources) U.S.

    8) Missing and Unidentifed Remains (FBI National Crime Information Center Missing Person and Unidentified Person Statistics at Year End). U.S.

    9) Children Exposed to Violence - Rate: 60% Ages 17 or Younger (Office of Justices Programs) U.S. link Number: Children - Birth to 13 Years Old (census.gov) link2

    10) Correction Populations - Number of persons under correctional supervision (Bureau Of Justice Statistics)  U.S. link

    11) Prisoners at Year End (Bureau of Justice Statistics) U.S. link

     

      1            2           3         4            5          6            7         8             9               10         11

     

    2003 5,401,720  31,484  411,128   91,545  27,127,477   3,928      N/A   34,010,509   6,917,700  1,468,601

    2004 5,182,670  32,439  425,650   94,655  27,436,649 10,090      N/A   33,983,444   6,987,900  1,497,100

    2005 5,173,720  32,637  372,722   99,685  27,156,734  8,152  103,768  33,987,358   7,045,100  1,527,929

    2006 6,094,720  33,300  395,276 103,026  27,671,499  8,695  110,484  34,062,832   7,176,000  1,569,945

    2007 5,177,100  34,598  395,320 105,345  27,731,818  8,815  105,229  34,260,730   7,267, 500 1,598,245

    2008 4,859,510      N/A  376,306      N/A   27,877,748  4,285  102,764  34,469,673   7,274,600  1,609,759

    2009 4,343,450      N/A  374,486      N/A   27,632,781  3,342   96,192   34,672,042   7,225,800  1,613,656

     

     

    Second Set Summary

    Total of death or injury in the U.S. Per Year intentional or unintentional which also includes U.S. Military Service members. Also included are missing people in the U.S. as well as unidentified remains and Children 12 or under who have been exposed to violence within the last year in the U.S. Total consists of first 9 Columns.

     

    Year                 Total                     U.S. Population (FBI UCR) Same as First Set

     

    2003            67,184,917                          290,788,976

    2004            67,272,723                          293,656,842

    2005            66,934,776                          296,410,404

    2006            68,479,832                          299,398,484

    2007            67,818,955                          301,621,157

    2008            67,828,419                          304,374,846

    2009            67,260,426                          307,006,550

     

    For numbers that we unavailable, averages were take from the previous two years or if that was not available from the two subsequent years.

    ________________________________________________________________________________________ 

     

    The F.B.I UCR Redefines Rape - Forbes 1.18.12

     

    _____________________________________________________________________________________

                                           Federal Inmate Population   Link

     

    The Federal Bureau of Prisons was established in 1930 to provide more progressive and humane care for Federal inmates, to professionalize the prison service, and to ensure consistent and centralized administration of the 11 Federal prisons in operation at the time. Today, the Bureau consists of 116 institutions. Population 209,360 1.29.11.

    Drug Offenses: 100,073 (51.3 %)
    Weapons, Explosives, Arson: 29,748 (15.2 %)
    Immigration: 21,577 (11.1 %)
    Robbery: 8,486 (4.3 %)
    Burglary, Larceny, Property Offenses: 6,823 (3.5 %)
    Extortion, Fraud, Bribery: 9,986 (5.1 %)
    Homicide, Aggravated Assault, and Kidnapping Offenses: 5,409 (2.8 %)
    Miscellaneous: 1,877 (1.0 %)
    Sex Offenses: 9,029 (4.6 %)
    Banking and Insurance, Counterfeit, Embezzlement: 858 (0.4 %)
    Courts or Corrections: 611 (0.3 %)
    Continuing Criminal Enterprise: 516 (0.3 %)
    National Security: 102 (0.1 %)

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Inmates By Security Level
    Minimum: 17.3 %
    Low: 38.0 %
    Medium: 29.3 %
    High: 11.0 %
    Unclassified1: 4.2 %

    Inmates By Gender
    Male: 195,899 (93.6 %)
    Female: 13,461 (6.4 %)

    Inmates By Race
    White: 120,991 (57.8 %)
    Black: 81,048 (38.7 %)
    Native American: 3,766 (1.8 %)
    Asian: 3,555 (1.7 %)

    Ethnicity
    Hispanic: 69,055 (33.0 %)

    Inmate Age
    Average Inmate Age: 39

    Citizenship
    United States: 154,769 (73.9 %)
    Mexico: 36,610 (17.5 %)
    Colombia: 2,602 (1.2 %)
    Cuba: 1,754 (0.8 %)
    Dominican Republic: 2,562 (1.2 %)
    Other/Unknown: 11,063 (5.3 %)

     

     

    State Prisons U.S. - Admissions By Offense Per Year Link

     

              Property     Drug      Violent   Public Order   Other   Admin/Year  T/State Pop. T/Fed Pop.  %/Fed     Total

     

    2007   197,800   193,700   170,200    80,600     4,100      646,500      1,353,646    179,204    13.24   1,532,261

    2008   201,700   194,200   184,600    94,700     4 ,100     679,300      1,407,479    201,280    14.30   1,609,759

    2009          N/A           N/A          N/A          N/A         N/A             N/A      1,405,622    208,118    14.81   1,613,740

    2010          N/A           N/A          N/A          N/A         N/A             N/A      1,404,203    209,360    14.91   1,613.563

     

     

    State Prisons U.S. - Polulation by Offence Per Year Link

     

    Year        Violent     % Violent/Male      Property    Drug Offen.   Pulic-Order Offen.   Other       Total     

     

    2005        687,700      95.45            248,900            253,300           98,700             8,100      1,208,500

    2006        667,900      95.54            227,900            265,800           112,300           7,200      1,331,100

    2007        692,800      95.43            265,300            273,600           103,100         18,900      1,353,600

    2008        715,400      95.29            251,800            251,400           125,900          17,800     1,365,400

     

     

    Inmate Deaths and Sexual Violence Against Inmates Per Year

     

    1) Year  2) Federal Prison Deaths (All Causes) Link   3) State Prison Deaths (All Causes)   Link   4) Local Jail Deaths (All Casues) Link   5)Arrest Related Deaths (All Causes) Link   6) Executions  Link    7) Sexual Violence*  Link   8) Total

     

    1            2            3            4            5         6             7               8

     

    2004    333      3,138     1,024      670       59       8,210       13,434

    2005    388      3,177     1,049      679       60       6,241       11,594

    2006    328      3,242     1,098      710       53       6,528       11,959

    2007     368     3,388     1,102       N/A      42       7,374       12,968

    2008     399         N/A        N/A       N/A      37       7,444       12,989

     

    For numbers that we unavailable, averages were take from the previous two years or if that was not available from the two subsequent years.

     

    *About 54% of substanciated incidents of sexual vitimization involed only inmate, while 46% of substantiated incidents involved staff with inmates. Janurary 2011.

     

    *Female unmates were disproportionaly victimized by both other inmates and staff in federal and state prisons, as well as local jails. January 2011

     

    Substantiated incidents of inmate-on-inmate sexual victimization. Perpetrators were 82% male. 2007/2008

     

     

    ______________________________________________________________________________________

     

    National Institute For Corrections- U.S. Dept. of Justice   Link

     

    International Centre for Prison Studies - World Prison Population List 2008  Link

     

    More than 9.8 million people are held in penal institutions throughout the world, mostly as pre-trial detainees (remand prisoners) or as sentenced prisoners. Almost half of these are in the United States (2.29m), Russia (0.89m) or China (1.57m sentenced prisoners). A further 850,000 are held in ?administrative detention? in China; if these are included the overall Chinese total is over 2.4 million and the world total over 10.65 million

     

    The United States has the highest prison population rate in the world, 756 per 100,000 of the national population, followed by Russia (629), Rwanda (604), St Kitts & Nevis (588), Cuba (c.531), U.S. Virgin Is. (512), British Virgin Is. (488), Palau (478), Belarus (468), Belize (455), Bahamas (422), Georgia (415), American Samoa (410), Grenada (408) and Anguilla (401).

    ____________________________________________________________________________________


    State of Recidivism: The Revolving Door of America's Prisons. "More than four in 10 offenders returned to state prison within three years of their release." The Pew Center on the States.  Link

     

    ____________________________________________________________________

    Law Enforcement Deaths, Assaults and Injuries by Year   Link

     

                                                  Year           Deaths*        Assaults**       Injuries**

     

                                                 2003             148               58,278            16,412

                                                 2004             164               60,054            16,737

                                                 2005             162               59,428            16,072

                                                 2006             154               59,907            15,916

                                                 2007             185               60,851            15,736

                                                 2008             138               60,139            15,554

                                                 2009             116               57,268            14,985

     

    Average over the Last Decade - 163 deaths per year - 58,821 assults per year - 16,041 injuries per year

     

    * Source: National Law Enforcement Officers memorial Fund

    ** Source: Federal Bueau of Investigation

    ________________________________________________________________________________________

    Four Measures of Serious Violent Crime  Link

    Serious Violent Crimes (including homicide)

     

      NCVS UCR
    Year Total Violent Crime Victimizations reported to the police Crimes recorded by the police

    Arrests for violent crime

    1973 3,589,800 1,860,400 715,300 392,700
    1974 3,799,300 2,029,300 790,300 462,900
    1975 3,593,800 1,975,300 843,300 441,100
    1976 3,612,500 2,038,800 822,100 414,600
    1977 3,661,700 1,966,000 844,900 438,500
    1978 3,625,300 1,879,000 893,300 469,900
    1979 3,834,000 2,019,800 998,000 467,700
    1980 3,793,600 2,036,700 1,107,500 482,900
    1981 4,100,900 2,217,100 1,124,200 496,600
    1982 3,925,300 2,231,800 1,107,400 547,400
    1983 3,454,700 1,876,600 1,064,200 516,600
    1984 3,682,500 2,002,800 1,081,100 501,600
    1985 3,357,700 1,925,700 1,125,900 506,800
    1986 3,283,800 1,899,300 1,268,000 565,000
    1987 3,424,100 1,987,000 1,264,500 568,100
    1988 3,562,100 1,941,100 1,335,800 600,000
    1989 3,532,800 1,846,900 1,404,100 666,100
    1990 3,499,700 1,948,300 1,555,900 722,400
    1991 3,711,100 2,132,000 1,631,700 738,200
    1992 3,985,800 2,159,800 1,656,100 722,700
    1993 4,190,000 2,217,500 1,647,100 716,100
    1994 4,115,000 2,109,900 1,604,600 778,800
    1995 3,493,500 1,756,400 1,549,900 796,200
    1996 3,260,100 1,740,400 1,444,600 729,900
    1997 3,038,200 1,740,900 1,404,300 717,800
    1998 2,776,000 1,587,100 1,321,100 675,900
    1999 2,529,100 1,408,500 1,233,500 636,000
    2000 2,186,300 1,250,800 1,223,500 625,300
    2001 2,014,300 1,181,100 1,229,000 627,100
    2002 1,685,900 1,035,700 1,216,100 620,500
    2003 1,829,900 1,068,700 1,179,000 597,000
    2004 1,648,100 1,030,200 1,162,100 590,300
    2005 1,822,000 1,051,800 1,190,800 603,500
    2006*     1,228,700 611,500
    2007 1,613,100 972,000 1,215,500 597,400
    2008 1,530,400 925,500 1,190,500 594,900
    2009 1,459,200 903,300 1,130,700 581,800
             

    Note: The serious violent crimes included are rape, robbery, aggravated assault, and homicide. Because of changes made to the victimization survey, data prior to 1992 are adjusted to make them comparable to data collected under the redesigned methodology. Estimates for 1993 and beyond are based on collection year while earlier estimates are based on data year.

    *Victimization trends exclude NCVS estimates for 2006 because of methodological inconsistencies between the data for that year and the data for other years. Changes to the NCVS and their impact upon the survey's estimates in 2006 are discussed in the Criminal Victimization, 2006 Technical Notes.

    The measures of violent crime come from two sources of data:

    1) The National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) a household survey ongoing since 1972, this survey of households interviews about 134,000 persons age 12 and older in 77,200 households each year about their victimizations from crime.
    2) The Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) that collects information on crimes and arrests reported by law enforcement authorities to the FBI.

    Definitions
    Total violent crime: The estimated number of homicides of persons age 12 and older recorded by police plus the number of rapes, robberies, and aggravated assaults from the victimization survey whether or not they were reported to the police. From NCVS + homicide from the UCR.
    Victimizations reported to the police: The estimated number of homicides of persons age 12 and older recorded by police plus the number of rapes, robberies, and aggravated assaults from the victimization survey that victims said were reported to the police. From the NCVS + homicide from the UCR.
    Crimes recorded by the police: The estimated number of homicides, forcible rapes, robberies, and aggravated assaults included in the Uniform Crime Reports of the FBI excluding commercial robbery and crimes involving victims under age 12 from the UCR.
    Arrests for violent crimes: The number of persons arrested for homicide, forcible rape, robbery or aggravated assault as reported by law enforcement agencies to the FBI. From the UCR.

     

    Source: National Crime Victimization Survey and Uniform Crime Reports

     

    _______________________________________________________________________________

     

    U.S. Polulation out of the Country

     

    With U.S. President Barack Obama's announcement that he's sending an additional 30,000 troops to Afghanistan, it's important to note that the number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan is only a small portion of the total number deployed abroad.

     

    There are 516,273 U.S. military service members in approximately 150 foreign countries. These numbers include troops deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan along with permanently stationed troops in places such as Germany, Italy and Japan. Iraq has the largest U.S. military presence with 171,000 troops, though this will decrease over the next few years.There are approximately 1.6 million service members in all of the U.S. armed forces. About 1.13 million troops are stationed inside the United States and the rest are deployed around the world. 12.2.2009

    UPI.

     

    A July 4, 2007, Los Angeles Times article reports: "More than 180,000 civilians � including Americans, foreigners and Iraqis � are working in Iraq under U.S. contracts, according to State and Defense department figures obtained by the Los Angeles Times. ...   link


    Concerning the number of security-related contractors an April 19, 2004, New York Times article states: "But more and more, they give the appearance of private, for-profit militias � by several estimates, a force of roughly 20,000 on top of an American military presence of 130,000.  link

    ________________________________________________________________________________________

     

    Violent Crime Up or Down in America? 

    F.B.I UCR 4 year Summary Violent Crime U.S. (March 2011)  Link

     

    Results according to the FBI Uniform Crime Reporting measure (UCR) and The National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) if available.  fbi.gov

     

    2005 vs. 2006:  Up 1.9% (UCR) The 5-year trend (2006 compared with 2002) indicated that violent crime decreased 0.4 percent. link

     

    2006 vs. 2007:  Down 1.8% (UCR) Violent crime rates in 2007 (20.7 per 1,000 persons age 12 or older) were not significantly different from those in 2005 (21.1 per 1,000 persons). (NCVS) link

     

    2007 vs. 2008:  Down 3.5% (UCR)  The violent crime rate in 2008 -19.3 victimizations per 1,000 persons age 12 or older was statistically unchanged from the previous year's estimate of 20.7 per 1,000 persons. (NCVS) link

     

    2008 vs.2009:  Down 4.4% (UCR) The rate of violent crime declined between 2008 and 2009 (NCVS) link

     

    2009 vs. 2010 - 6 Months:  Down 6.2% (UCR)  Jan-June Preliminary  link 

     

    2009 vs. 2010 (Preliminary) -12 Months:  Down 5.5% (UCR)  link

     

    Notes on 2010 Preliminary UCR Report from the F.B.I. -  Figures used in this Report were submitted voluntarily by law enforcement agencies throughout the country. Individuals using these tabulations are cautioned against drawing conclusions by making direct comparisons between cities. Comparisons lead to simplistic and/or incomplete analyses that often create misleading perceptions adversely affecting communities and their residents. Valid assessments are possible only with careful study and analysis of the range of unique conditions affecting each local law enforcement jurisdiction. It is important to remember that crime is a social problem and, therefore, a concern of the entire community. The efforts of law enforcement are limited to factors within its control. The data user is, therefore, cautioned against comparing statistical data of individual agencies. Further information on this topic can be obtained in the annual UCR report Crime in the United States, 2009. Report issued by Robert S. Mueller III, Director, Federal Bureau of Investigation, United States Department of Justice, Washington, D.C. 20535.  Link

     

    New F.B.I UCR 4 Year Comparison Violent Crime U.S.(May 2011): 2007 (-0.7), 2008 (-1.9%)  2009 (-5.3%), 2010 (-5.5%).  Link

     

    Are the U.S. wars a factor in the lower U.S. Crimes Statistics in 2009 and 2010?

     

    U.S. Military deployed and contractors increased from 2004 on increase from a 200,000 service people to possibly 600,000 or more in 2011. 3 time more then the norm. It had been consistently been approximately 200,000 U.S. Troops out of the U.S.A for the previous 8 years 1995-2003.

     

    Is the violence being done to non-U.S. Citizens, fellow service people and to themselves by military personnel outside of the U.S. of the country a piece of violence we are not taken into account when analyzing violence in America?

     

    Southern States in the U.S. account for a high percentage of military recruits.

     

    The Southern Military Tradition. The South is overrepresented among military recruits. It provided 42.2 percent of 1999 recruits and 41.0 percent of 2003 recruits but contained just 35.6 percent of the population ages 18-24. The Heritage Foundation November 7, 2005. Link

    Some of the states that had the biggest decrease of violence in 2009 and 2010 were Kentucky, South Carolina, Alabama and Florida. All Southern States. We need to do these service personal a service and greet them with all the support they need as soon as the step back on our soil to both make sure that they don't suffer higher percentage unemployed, drugs abuse, suicide or domestic violence then non service personnel. It would be a disservice to them and a disservice to our country to have their bear these problems and stop the great progress made on a reduction of violence. Having them suffer and seeing our violence crimes victimization goes up would be the worst of both worlds.

    _________________________________________________________________________________________

     

    Total Crimes per Country     Link


    Rank   Countries  Amount 
    # 1   United States: 11,877,218 
    # 2   United Kingdom: 6,523,706 
    # 3   Germany: 6,507,394 
    # 4   France: 3,771,850 
    # 5   Russia: 2,952,370 
    # 6   Japan: 2,853,739 
    # 7   South Africa: 2,683,849 
    # 8   Canada: 2,516,918 
    # 9   Italy: 2,231,550 
    # 10   India: 1,764,630 
    # 11   Korea, South: 1,543,220 
    # 12   Mexico: 1,516,029 
    # 13   Netherlands: 1,422,863 
    # 14   Poland: 1,404,229 
    # 15   Argentina: 1,340,529 
    # 16   Sweden: 1,234,784 
    # 17   Belgium: 973,548 
    # 18   Spain: 923,271 
    # 19   Chile: 593,997 
    # 20   Thailand: 565,108 
    # 21   Ukraine: 553,594 
    # 22   Austria: 552,411 
    # 23   Finland: 520,194 
    # 24   Denmark: 491,026 
    # 25   New Zealand: 427,230 


    SOURCE: The Eighth United Nations Survey on Crime Trends and the Operations of Criminal Justice Systems (2002) (United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, Centre for International Crime Prevention)

    Homicide Rates for Selected Countries, 2006   Link

    Source: Statistical Office of the European Communities

    Missing and Unidentified People

    The National Crime Information Center (NCIC) F.B.I   Link

     

    NCIC Missing Person File: The National Crime Information Center?s (NCIC) Missing Person File was implemented in 1975. Records in the Missing Person File are retained indefinitely, until the individual is located or the record is canceled by the entering agency. The Missing Person File contains records for individuals reported missing who:

    • have a proven physical or mental disability (Disability?EMD);
    • are missing under circumstances indicating that they may be in physical danger (Endangered?EME);
    • are missing after a catastrophe (Catastrophe Victim?EMV);
    • are missing under circumstances indicating their disappearance may not have been voluntary (Involuntary?EMI);
    • are under the age of 21 and do not meet the above criteria (Juvenile?EMJ); or
    • are 21 and older and do not meet any of the above criteria but for whom there is a reasonable concern for their safety (Other?EMO).

     

    NCIC Unidentified Person File: NCIC's Unidentified Person File came online in 1983. Records are retained indefinitely, unless removed by the entering agency. The Unidentified Person File contains records of:

    • unidentified deceased persons (Deceased?EUD);
    • persons of any age who are living and unable to determine their identity (Living?EUL); and
    • unidentified catastrophe victims (Catastrophe Victim?EUV).

     

    As of December 31, 2010, NCIC contained 85,820 active missing person records. Juveniles under the age of 18 account for 38,505 (44.9 percent) of the records and 10,248 (11.9 percent) were for juveniles between the ages of 18 and 20. 51% reported missing were female. There were also 7,539 Active Entries of Unidentified Persons.   Link

     

    As of December 31, 2009, NCIC contained 96,192 active missing person records. Juveniles under the age of 18 account for 44,349 (46.1 percent) of the records and 12,461 (13.0 percent) were for juveniles between the ages of 18 and 20. There were also 7,302 Active Entries of Unidentified Persons.  Link

     

    As of December 31, 2008, there were 102,764 active missing person records in NCIC. Juveniles under the age of 18 account for 51,054 (49.7 percent) of the records and 12,648 (12.3 percent) were for juveniles between the ages of 18 and 20. There were also 7,134 Active Entries of Unidentified Persons.  Link

     

    As of December 31, 2007, there were 105,229 active missing person records in NCIC. Juveniles under the age of 18 accounted for 54,648 (51.93%) of the records, and 12,362 (11.75%) were for juveniles between the ages of 18 and 20. There were also 6,945 Active Entries of Unidentified Persons.   Link

     

    Other Links

     

    F.B.I Kidnapped and Missing Persons     someoneismissing.com    National Center for Missing and Exploited Children/missingkids.com   Let's Bring Them Home (LBTH)  America's Most Wanted  The Charley Project   The Doe Network  Cue Center for Missing Persons  National Missing and Unidentified Missing Persons System (NamUs)

    _______________________________________________________________________

     

    Population Chart (census.gov)

     

    U.S.A. (July 1st) Total    Change  Change %  % World Total  link       World Total         Change     Change %   link

     

    2003      290,326,418   2,522,504   0.88    4.60                                 6,317,998,040    75,743,205    1.199

    2004      293,045,739   2,719,321   0.94    4.59                                 6,393,741,245    75,947,519    1.188

    2005      295,753,151   2,707,412   0.93    4.58                                 6,469,688,764    76,611,138    1.184

    2006      298,593,212   2,840,061   0.96    4.57                                 6,546,299,902    77,615,059    1.186

    2007      301,579,895   2,986,683   1.00    4.56                                 6,623,914,961    77,068,145    1.163

    2008      304,374,846   2,794,951   0.93    4.55                                 6,700,983,106    75,780,131    1.131

    2009      307,006,550   2,631,704   0.87    4.53                                 6,776,763,237    75,709,586    1.117

    2010      308,745,538   1,738,988   0.57    4.51                                 6,852,472,823    75,725,430    1.105

     

     

    U.S. Vital Events Per Time Unit: 2011

     

                 Time Unit        Births             Deaths        Natural Increase      Net International Migration*   Link

     

                    Year          4,311,000      2,611,000         1,699,000                  1,300,000                 Pop. By Country

     

    *Net international migration includes the international migration of both native and foreign-born populations.  Specifically, it includes: (a) the net international migration of the foreign born, (b) the net international migration of the native born, (c) the net migration between the United States and Puerto Rico, and (d) the net movement of the Armed Forces population between the United States and overseas.

    World Vital Events Per Time Unit: 2011

     

                                        Time Unit            Births                  Deaths           Natural Increase      Link

     

                                           Year            132,697,074         56,260,324          76,436,750

     

     

    Population Projection (census.gov)

     

                   U.S.           Change/2010  %/2010  %/World    Link             World            Change/2010    %/2010   Link

     

    2020  341,387,000    32,641,462       9.57      4.50                    7,592,888,345       740,415,522       9.76

    2030  373,504,000    64,758,462     17.34      4.53                    8,248,535,284    1,396,062,461     16.93

    2040  405,655,000    96,909,462     23.89      4.61                    8,800,661,481    1,948,188,658     22.14

    2050  439,010,000  130,264,462     29.68      4.75                    9,256,342,700    2,403,869,877     25.97

     

    World Population to Reach 10 billion by 2100. United Nations 5.3.11   Link

     

    Population History   Link

    (how many people have ever lived on earth)

     

    Year                            Population

     

    8,000 B.C.                   5,000,000

    1 A.D.                      300,000,000

    1200                       450,000,000

    1650                       500,000,000

    1750                       795,000,000

    1850                    1,265,000,000

    1900                    1,656,000,000

    1950                    2,516,000,000

    1995                    5,760,000,000

    2002                    6,215,000,000

     

          Number who have ever been born                             106,456,367,669

          World Population in mid-2002                                         6,215,000,000         

          Percent of those ever born who were living in 2002                       5.8%

     

          Source: Population Reference Bureau Estimates

    __________________________________________________________________________________________

    Deaths by Atrocities in the 20th Century  Link

    (wars, massacres, oppressions)

     

                         Deaths                                                Atrocitologist

     

                         203,000,000                                       M. Cherif Bassouni

                         167,000,000 to 175,000,000              Zbigniew Brzezinski

                         214,000,000 to 226,000,000              Milton Leitenberg

                         258,327,000                                       Rudolph J. Rummel

                         203,000,000                                       Mathew White

     

     

    Deaths in 21st Century African Conflicts  wikipedia.org

     

    Second Congo War:  Approximately1,800,000 Deaths (3,800,000 deaths since 1998)

    Darfur Conflict: Approximately 400,000 Deaths.  2,850,000 people displaced.

    War in Somalia: Approximately 31,460 Deaths.   1,400,000 people displaced.

    Ivorian Civil War: 3,000 Deaths.

    Chad Civil War: 1,140 Deaths.

    Egyptian Revolution: 324 Deaths

    Tunisian Revolution: 223 Deaths

    Libyan Revolution: 1000+ Deaths

     

    Necrometrics

    (Part of the Historical Atlas of the 20th Century by Matthew White) Death Tolls across history     Index Link

     

    Statistics of Wars, Oppressions and Atrocities of the Nineteenth Century (the 1800s). 45 Million Killed.   Link

     

    Statistics of Wars, Oppressions and Atrocities of the Eighteenth Century

    (the 1700s). 18 Million Killed.   Link

     

    Before the 18th Century.   Page 1     Page 2

     

    __________________________________________________________________________________________

    U.S. Military

     

    The latest US armed forces strength figures as of February 28, 2011 stood at 1,434,862.   Link

     

    By Service 2.28.11 -   Army 570,013, Air Force 334,894, Navy 327,933, Marine Corps 202,022.  Plus there were 42,419 in the Coast Guard.   Link

     

    Active Duty 9.30.10 1,430,985  -    Men: 1,222,714 (85.44%)     Women: 208,271 (14.56%).    Link

     

    Veteran Population 17 Years or Older-  22.7 Million as of 9.30.10.   Estimated Veteran population in 2032, 15 Million.  Although the overall population of veterans is going down the population of female and minority veterans is going up.   Link

     

    U.S. Military Casualties in War Deployments (Partial Listing) Link

     

    War                                            Date                      Deaths             Wounded         U.S. Total     All Casualties Link

     

    American Revolutionary War   1775-1783                25,000              25,000             50,000                 77,294

    War of 1812                            1812-1815                17,260                4,505             21,765                 30,365

    Mexican-American War            1846-1848                13,283                4,125             17,435                 33,345

    Seminole Wars (Three)           1817-1858                  1,608                    N/A                  N/A                      N/A

    Civil War (Both Sides)             1861-1865              625,000             412,200        1,037,200           1,037,200

    Spanish-American War                    1898                   3,061                 2,633              4,068                 19,281

    Philippine-American War        1898-1913                   4,165                 3,000               7,165              596,165

    World War I                           1917-1918               116,516             204,002           320,518         37,000,000

    World War II                          1941-1945               405,399             670,846        1,078,245         60,000,000

    Korean War                           1950-1953                 53,686               92,134           128,650           5,040,968

    Vietnam War                         1955-1975                  58,209             153,303           211,454           5,042,046

    Beirut Deployment                 1982-1984                      266                    169                  435                      N/A

    Invasion Of Grenada                      1983                         19                    119                  138                     646

    Invasion of Panama                       1989                         40                    324                  364                  3,054

    Somalia                                 1992-1993                         43                    153                  196                     N/A

    Gulf War                                1990-1991                       258                    849               1,231                34,830

    Bosnia/Kosovo                      1995-2006                         32                        8                    40                96,667

    Iraq                       (2003 Through 2010)                   4,430                31,965             36,395              289,317

    Afghanistan           (2001 Through 2010)                   1,413                  9,971             12,035             175,729

     

    The minimum age for enlistment in the United States Military is 17 (with parental consent) and 18 (without parental consent). The maximum age is 42. However, DOD policy allows the individual services to specify the maximum age of enlistment based upon their own unique requirements. In order to join the US Military, you must either be a US citizen, or you must be a legal permanent immigrant, physically living in the United States, with a green card. goarmy.com   Link

     

    _______________________________________________________________________________________

    September 11, 2001 Attacks on The United States

     

    9/11 by the Numbers, New York Magazine

     

    Total number killed in attacks (official figure as of 9/5/02): 2,819

    Age of the greatest number who died: between 35 and 39

    Ratio of men to women who died: 3:1

    Number of people who lost a spouse or partner in the attacks: 1,609

    Number of nations whose citizens were killed in attacks: 115

     

    Sept. 11: For the Record, USA Today

     

    The youngest passenger on the hijacked jets was Christine Hanson on United Airlines Flight 175. She was 2 and on her first trip to Disneyland.

    Two-thousand children lost a parent Sept. 11, including 146 who lost a parent at the Pentagon.

    The New York City Fire Department lost 343 firefighters, almost half the number of on-duty deaths in the department's 100-year history.

    More civilians (70) than people in the military (55) were killed at the Pentagon.

    350,000 pages from the CIA and 20,000 pages from the FBI were produced for congressional hearings about possible intelligence failures before Sept. 11.

    There were 19 hijackers. Hijackers Mohammed Atta and Marwan al-Shehhi spent $48 on Sept. 7 at Shuckums, a Hollywood, Fla., bar. Each had five drinks.

     

    The 9/11 Commission Report January 26, 2004.

     

    "There is evidence that Mullah Omar initially opposed a major al Qaeda operation directly against the United State in 2011. Furthermore, by July, with word spreading of a coming attack, a schism emerged among the senior leadership of al Qaeda. Several senior members reportedly agreed with Mullah Omar."

     

    "According to KSM (Khalid Sheikh Mohammed), in late August, when the operation was fully planned, Bin Laden formally notified the al Qaeda Shura Council that a major attack against the United States would take place in the coming weeks. When some council member objected, Bin Laden countered that Mullah Omar lacked the authority to prevent al Qaeda from conducting jihad outside of Afghanistan. Though most of the Shura Council reportedly disagreed, Bin laden insisted. The attacks went forward." 

     

    9/11 Congressional Report Faults F.B.I.-C.I.A. Lapses New York Times July 24, 2003

     

    9/11 panel blasts CIA, FBI's lapses in coming report USA Today July 21, 2003

     

    Debunking the 9/11 Myths: Special Report Popular Mechanics February 3, 2005

     

    U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA)

     

    CIA & The War on Terrorism: "We are a nation at war with al-Qaeda and its associates, and that war is persistent, and they are an enemy that continues to drive towards their goal of attacking this country ... The President has made clear that his top national security priority, and therefore CIA's top priority, is to strike back -- to disrupt, dismantle, and ultimately defeat al-Qaeda and its terrorist allies." D-CIA Leon E. Panetta, University of Oklahoma, March 8, 2010.     Link

                   

    Mission: The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an independent US Government agency responsible for providing national security intelligence to senior US policymakers.   Link

    _____________________________________________________________________________________________________

    Terrorist Attacks

     

    The Worldwide Incidents Tracking System is the National Counterterrorism Center's database of terrorist incidents. According to NCTC definition, terrorism occurs when groups or individuals acting on political motivation deliberately or recklessly attack civilians/non-combatants or their property and the attack does not fall into another special category of political violence, such as crime, rioting, or tribal violence.   Link

     

    Terrorist Incidents Grouped by Country With 20 or More Fatalities 2006-2010

    Country Attacks Dead Wounded Hostage Victims
    Afghanistan 35 1,118 1,386 17 2,521
    Algeria 6 191 612 0 803
    Central African Republic 1 26 22 50 98
    Chad 9 715 1,170 0 1,885
    Colombia 1 20 0 0 20
    Congo, Democratic Republic 26 2,174 189 668 3,031
    Ethiopia 4 199 33 7 239
    India 18 1,229 2,638 148 4,015
    Iran 6 215 697 7 919
    Iraq 240 10,020 22,613 63 32,696
    Lebanon 2 198 15 0 213
    Nepal 1 24 17 29 70
    Nigeria 2 68 76 1 145
    Pakistan 67 3,023 6,799 16 9,838
    Philippines 2 132 6 50 188
    Russia 3 104 470 0 574
    Somalia 36 1,382 2,722 0 4,104
    Sri Lanka 9 375 903 0 1,278
    Sudan 22 1,050 354 14 1,418
    Uganda 1 76 114 0 190
    Total 491 22,339 40,836 1,070 64,245

    _______________________________________________________________________________________

    Armed Forces Personnel by Country    Link

    Source: IISS (International Institute for Strategic Studies). 2001. The Military Balance 2001-2002. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Total for 149 Countries 19,669,000.  Top 50:

     

    #1        China                   2,810,000              #26   Eritrea                  200,000

    #2        Russia                  1,520,000              #27   Moroco                 198,000

    #3        United States       1,366,000              #28   Mexico                 193,000

    #4        India                    1,303,000              #29   Israel                   172,000

    #5        South Korea            683,000              #30   Spain                  166,000

    #6        Pakistan                  612,000              #31   Greece                159,000

    #7        Turkey                     610,000              #32   Columbia             152,000

    #8        Iran                         513,000              #33   Cambodia            140,000

    #9        Vietnam                   484,000              #34   Bangladesh         137,000

    #10      Egypt                       448,000              #35   Algeria                134,000

    #11      Ethiopia                   352,000              =36   Sri Lanka             115,000

    #12      Burma                      344,000              =36   Peru                    115,000

    #13      Syria                        316,000              #38   Angola                108,000 

    #14      Ukraine                    304,000              #39   Philippines          106,000

    #15      Thailand                   301,000              =40   Jordan                104,000

    #16      Indonesia                 297,000              =40   Sudan                104,000

    #17      France                      294,000              =42   Malasyia              96,000

    #18      Brazil                        288,000              #43   Chile                    87,000

    #19      Italy                         251,000              #44    Belarus               83,000

    #20      Japan                       237,000              #45    Bulgaria              80,000

    #21      Germany                  221,000              =46    Nigeria                76,000

    #22      Poland                     217,000              =46     Lybia                  76,000

    #23      United Kingdom       212,000               #48   Azerbaijan          72,000

    #24      Romaina                  207,000               #49   Argentina            71,000

    #25      Saudi Arabia            202,000               #50   Rwanda              70,000

     

    The Military Balance 2011 Report  by the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS)  Link

     

    Global redistribution of military power under way, says IISS. There is persuasive evidence that a global redistribution of military power is under way, according to the latest edition of The Military Balance, published today by the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS). The US and other Western powers are losing their monopoly in key areas of defence technology, including stealth aircraft, unmanned systems and cyber warfare.

     

    The International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS) is the world's leading authority on political-military conflict. The IISS, based in London, is both a limited company in UK law and a registered charity.

    _______________________________________________________________________________________

    Economics

     

    Military Expenditures - World - (C.I.A. World Factbook)  Link

     

    Roughly 2% of GDP of World gross world product (2005 est.). Spending on defense programs for the most recent year available as a percent of gross domestic product (GDP); the GDP is calculated on an exchange rate basis.

     

    GDP (official exchange rate): GWP (gross world product): World  $62.27 trillion (2010 est.)
     
    GDP real growth rate World: 4.7% (2010 est.), -0.7% (2009 est.), 2.7% (2008 est.).
     

    waragainstviolence.org estimate of World Military Expenditures in 2010 (CIA Data):  1.245 Trillion U.S. Dollars.

    globalsecurity.org   estimate  World 2007:   2.157 Trillion U.S. Dollars.              Link
    World Bank estimate World  2009:  2.65% of GDP     Link
    Spira estimate World 2010:    2.6% of GDP     1.630 Trillion U.S. Dollars  Link
     
    Military Expenditures - United States - (C.I.A. World Factbook)  Link

     

    United States Military Spending 4.06% of GDP (2005 est.)

     

    GDP (official exchange rate): United States $14.62 trillion (2010 est.)

     

    GDP (Real Growth Rate): United States  2.7% (2010 est.), -2.6% (2009 est.), 0% (2008 est.)

     

    waragainstviolence.org estimate of U.S. Military Expenditures in 2010 (CIA Data):  593 Billion U.S. Dollars.

    globalsecurity.org estimate U.S. 2007:  741 Billion U.S. Dollars   link

    World Bank estimate U.S. 2009:   4.68% of GDP,  661 Billion U.S. Dollars   Link

    Spira estimate U.S. 2010:   4.8% of GDP   $698 Billion U.S. Dollars    Link

     

    The United States Peace Index shows reductions in violence, crime and incarcerations to the same levels as Canada would result in $361 billion in savings and additional economic activity. This additional economic activity has the potential to create 2.7 million jobs, which would significantly reduce unemployment.   Link

     

    The Cost of bin Laden: 3 Trillion Over 15 Years. National Journal 05.11  Link

     

    Estimates of the cost of violence in the United States of America reach 3.3% of the gross domestic product. The total costs from violence - including homicide, wounding and sexual assault - amount to an estimated $40.2 billion annually. (WHO) 2004  Link

     

    Violence Costs Nation $70 Billion Annually, Study Finds. sciencedaily.com 06.07  Link

     

    In 2007, for crimes both reported and not reported, the total economic loss to victims was $2 billion for violent crime and $16 billion for property crime. The National Center for Victims of Crime (NCVC) Link

     

    The total costs associated with nonfatal injuries and deaths due to violence in 2000 were more than $70 billion. Most of this cost ($64.8 billion or 92%) was due to lost productivity. However, an estimated $5.6 billion was spent on medical care for the more than 2.5 million injuries due to interpersonal and self-directed violence. The estimates reported here provide evidence of the large health and economic burden of violence in the United States. (CDC)  Link

     

    The estimated annual cost of child abuse and neglect in the United States for 2007 is $104 billion. childhelp.org  Link

     

    Cost of violence against women 'beyond calculation,' warns UN chief. UN News Centre 03.09   Link

     

    In a one-year period, the cost of medical care and productivity losses associated with injuries from motor vehicle crashes exceeded $99 billion. (CDC)  Link

     

    Auto congestion in the USA's 83 largest urban areas last year led to more than 2,200 premature deaths and a related public health cost of at least $18 billion. USA Today 05.11  Link

     

    Motorcycle crash-related injuries and deaths totaled $12 billion in one year, in medical care costs and productivity losses. (CDC)  Link


    Gun violence costs nation 100 billion a year. Taxpayers carry bulk of burden, researchers say. Associated Press (AP) 02.08  Link

     

    Economically, more than $96 billion of total U.S. health care costs each year are attributable directly to smoking. In addition to health care costs, the costs of lost productivity due to smoking effects are estimated at $97 billion per year, bringing a conservative estimate of the economic burden of smoking to more than $193 billion per year.  National Institutes of Health (NIH) National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Link

     

    Unintended pregnancy costs taxpayers roughly $11 billion each year. (U.S.) guttmacher.org  Link

     

    In 2005, poisonings (unintentional) led to $33.4 billion in medical and productivity costs. (CDC)  Link

     

    In 1995, playground-related injuries among children ages 14 and younger cost an estimated $1.2 billion.  (CDC)  Link

     

    In 2000, direct medical costs of falls (older adults) totaled a little over $19 billion?$179 million for fatal falls and $19 billion for nonfatal fall injuries.  (CDC)  Link

     

    Fire and burn injuries represent 1% of the incidence of injuries and 2% of the total costs of injuries, or $7.5 billion each year. (CDC)  Link

     

    Average Economic Cost of Fatal and Nonfatal Injuries by Class of Injury, 2009 (National Safety Council)  Link
    Home injuries (fatal and nonfatal) per death $2,900,000
    Public nonmotor-vehicle injuries (fatal and nonfatal) per death $4,300,000
    Work injuries (fatal and nonfatal) per death,
       without employers - uninsured costs $44,300,000
       with employers - uninsured costs $47,200,000

     

    How the Cost of the Afghanistan War Compares to America's 11 other Wars.  Business Insider 07.10   Link

    Source: Congressional Resource Service (Figures are Inflation Adjusted) 06.10  Link

     

    American Revolution cost $2.41 billion. Date: 1775-1783

    War of 1812 cost $1.55 billion. Date: 1812-1815. Defense spending % of GDP: 2.7

    Mexican War cost $2.38 billion. Date: 1846-1849. Defense spending % of GDP: 1.9

    Civil War costs $79.7 billion for both sides. Date: 1861-1865.


    Civil War costs $79.7 billion for both sides

    Read more:
    http://www.businessinsider.com/cost-of-war-2010-7?op=1#ixzz1NUXIZRYE

    Civil War costs $79.7 billion for both sides

    Read more:
    http://www.businessinsider.com/cost-of-war-2010-7?op=1#ixzz1NUXIZRYE

    Spanish American War cost $9.03 billion. Date: 1898-1899. Defence spending % of GDP 1.5

    World War 1 cost $334 billion.  Date: 1917-1921. Defense spending % of GDP: 14.1

    World War 2 cost $4,104 billion. Date: 1941-1945. Defense spending % of GDP: 37.5

    Korean War cost $341 billion. Date: 1950-1953.Defense spending % of GDP: 13.2

    Vietnam cost $738 billion. Date: 1965-1975. Defense spending % of GDP: 9.5

    Persian Gulf War cost 102 billion.  Date: 1990-1991.

    Defense spending % of GDP: 4.6

    Afghanistan war cost $321 billion. Date: 2001-2010.

    Defense spending % of GDP: 4.3

    Iraq war cost $784 billion. Date: 2003-2010. Defense spending % of GDP: 4.3

    Total Post-9/11 wars cost $1,147 billion. Date: 2001-2010.

    Defense spending % of GDP: 4.3

     

    The true cost of the Iraq war: $3 trillion and beyond. Washington Post 09.10   Link

     

    Afghan war costs now outpace Iraq's. USA Today 05.10  Link

     

    House passes $690 billion defense bill. Associated Press (AP) 5.26.11   Link 

    __________________________________________________

    Stockholm International Peace Research Institute Data/Graphs (SPIRI)    Link

     

                 Graph 1          Graph 2         Graph 3

    ____________________________________________________________________________

     

    The Global Peace Index (GPI)  link

    Institute for Economics and Peace

     

    The results of the Global Peace Index (GPI) for 2010 suggest the world has become slightly less peaceful in the last year. This is the fourth edtion of the Global Peace Index.   Link          

     

    Four-year trend, overall, the world has become slightly less peaceful since 2007, with 62% of countries recording decreases in levels of peacefulness.   Link

     

    The results of the Global Peace Index (GPI) for 2009 suggest that the world has become slightly less peaceful in the past year. This is the third edition of the Global Peace Index.   Link

     

    "One of the conclusions we've come to is that the world is slightly - I emphasise slightly - more peaceful in 2007 than 2006". Leo Abbruzzese, North American editorial director of the Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU), the analysis branch of the Economist magazine charged with organizing the index and analysing the results.   Link

     

    The Institute for Economics and Peace (IEP) is an independent, not-for-profit international research institute dedicated to building a greater understanding of the key drivers and measures of peace and to identifying the economic benefits that increased peacefulness can deliver.   Link

    _____________________________________________________________________________

    World Health Organization (WHO)

    Violence and Injury Prevention and Disability (VIP)   Link

     

    Each year, over 1.6 million people worldwide lose their lives to violence. Violence is among the leading causes of death for people aged 15-44 years worldwide, accounting for 14% of deaths among males and 7% of deaths among females.

    Featured WHO publications and resources

     

    World Report on Violence and Health (2002)    Violence Prevention: The Evidence (2010) 

     

    Preventing Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence against Women (2010)    Preventing Child Maltreatment (2006)

     

    Full list of WHO violence prevention publications and resources

     

    Other United Nations Organizations

     

    United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organizagion (UNESCO)   - Encourages international peace and universal respect by promoting collaboration among nations.

     

    UNWOMEN - United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women.

     

    United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC)   -  UNODC Annual Reports

     

    European Institute for Crime Prevent and Control (HEUNI) International Statisics on Crime and Justice 2010 Report

    ______________________________________________________________________________________

    Amnesty International  Link

     

    In 2009, Amnesty International recorded:   Link

     

    Human Rights abusers enjoyed impunity for torture in at least 61 countries.

     

    People Tortured or otherwise Ill-Treated in at least 111 countries.

     

    Freedom of Expression restricted in at least 96 countries. 60% of all countries.

     

    Unfair Trials in at least 55 countries. 35% of all countries.

     

    Prisoners of Conscience held in at least 48 countries. 30% of all countries.

     

    Amnesty International Shop (Annual Reports)

    ____________________________________________________________________________

    Human Rights Watch    Link

     

     
    With disturbing frequency, governments that might have been counted on to generate pressure for human rights are accepting the rationalizations and subterfuges of repressive governments and giving up. In place of a commitment to exerting public pressure for human rights, they profess a preference for softer approaches such as private "dialogue" and "cooperation."

     

    There is nothing inherently wrong with dialogue and cooperation to promote human rights. But when the problem is a lack of political will to respect rights, public pressure is needed to change the cost-benefit analysis that leads to the choice of repression over rights. In such cases, the quest for dialogue and cooperation becomes a charade designed more to appease critics of complacency than to secure change, a calculated diversion from the fact that nothing of consequence is being done. Moreover, the refusal to use pressure makes dialogue and cooperation less effective because governments know there is nothing to fear from simply feigning serious participation.

    This report is Human Rights Watch's twenty-first annual review of human rights practices around the globe. It summarizes key human rights issues in more than 90 countries and territories worldwide.

     

    Human Rights Watch Publications (Annual Reports)

     

    Human Rights Watch is one of the leading indpendent organizations dedicated to defending and protecting human rights. By focusing international attention where human rights are violated, we give voice to the oppressed and hold oppressors accountable for their crimes. Our rigorous, objective investigations and strategic, targeted advocacy build intense pressure for action and raise the cost of human rights abuse.

    ___________________________________________________________________________

    The World Bank    Link

    World Development Report 2011   Link

     

    1.5 billion peoplelive in countries affected by organized violence, either currently or recovering from political violence, fragility and/or high levels of homicide.

     

    People living in countries currently affected by violence are twice as likely to be undernourished and 50 percent more likely to be impoverished. Their children are three times as likely to be out of school.

     

    42 million people(roughly equivalent to the entire population of Canada or Poland) are displaced today as a result of conflict, violence or human rights abuses. Of these, 15 million are refugees outside their country and 27 million are displaced internally within their own country.

     

    90 percent of civil wars in the 21st century occurred in countries that already had a civil war in the previous 30 years.

     

    In Guatemala, criminal violence today kills more people every year than the civil war in the 1980s did. In fact, intentional homicides are nearly double the average battle deaths directly from the civil war in the 1980s.

     

    The World Bank is a vital source of financial and technical assistance to developing countries around the world. Our mission is to fight poverty with passion and professionalism for lasting results and to help people help themselves and their environment by providing resources, sharing knowledge, building capacity and forging partnerships in the public and private sectors.

    ______________________________________________________________________________________


    Refugees-Displacement    Links

     

    Refugees International        U.S. Department of State Bureau of Popluation, Refugees and Migration

     

    U.S. Committee for Refugees and Immigrants     The United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHRC)    Red Cross

    ______________________________________________________________________________________

    International Criminal Court (ICC)    Link

     

    The International Criminal Court (ICC), governed by the Rome Statute, is the first permanent, treaty based, international criminal court established to help end impunity for the perpetrators of the most serious crimes of concern to the international community.  The Rome Statute entered into force on 1 July 2002 after ratification by 60 countries.

     

    The ICC is an independent international organisation, and is not part of the United Nations system. Its seat is at The Hague in the Netherlands. Although the Court's expenses are funded primarily by States Parties, it also receives voluntary contributions from governments, international organisations, individuals, corporations and other entities.

     

    The International Criminal Court (ICC) is an independent, permanent court that tries persons accused of the most serious crimes of international concern, namely genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes. The ICC is based on a treaty, joined by 114 countries.

    ICC Annual Reports                ICC Weekly Updates  

     

    81 Countries including 7 G20 Countires have not signed up to the International Criminal Court (ICC) - Amnesty International   Link

    _______________________________________________________________________________________

    Suicide and Self Harm

     

    U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)   Link

     

    National Suicide Prevention Lifeline     1-800-273-TALK (8255)

     

    Summer 2010  (2007 Statistics)    Link      

     

    Suicide was the eleventh leading cause of death for all ages.


    More than 34,000 suicides occurred in the U.S. This is the equivalent of 94 suicides per day.

    One-third of those who died by suicide were positive for alcohol at the time of death.


    Nearly 1 in 5 had evidence of opiates, including heroin and prescription pain killers.

     

    Males take their own lives at nearly four times the rate of females and represent 78.8% of all U.S. suicides.

     

    Firearms and the commonly used method of suicide amount males 55.7%.

     

    During their lifetime, women attempt suicide about two to three times as often as men.

     

    Poisoning is the most common method of suicide for females 40.2%.

     

    Overall firearms were slightly more than 50% of all suicides in 2007. CDC  Link

     

    Deaths from suicide are only part of the problem. More people survive suicide attempts than actually die. In 2008, 376,306 people received medical care for self-inflicted injuries at Emergency Departments across the United States. 163,489 of those were hospitalized. Link

     

    There is one suicide for every 25 attempted suicides.  Link

     

    Several factors can put a person at risk for suicide. However, having these risk factors does not always mean that suicide will occur. Some of the risk factors identified by research include:    Link

    • History of previous suicide attempts
    • Family history of suicide
    • History of depression or other mental illness
    • History of alcohol or drug abuse
    • Stressful life event or loss
    • Easy access to lethal methods
    • Exposure to the suicidal behavior of others
    • Incarceration

     

    Even the most severely depressed person has mixed feelings about death, and most waver until the very last moment between wanting to live and wanting to die. Most suicidal people do not want to die; they want the pain to stop. The impulse to end it all, however overpowering, does not last forever.   Link

     

    Almost everyone who commits or attempts suicide has given some clue or warning. Do not ignore suicide threats. Statements like "you'll be sorry when I'm dead," "I can't see any way out," -- no matter how casually or jokingly said, may indicate serious suicidal feelings.   Link

     

    Studies of suicide victims have shown that more then half had sought medical help within six month before their deaths and a majority had seen a medical professional within 1 month of their death.   Link

     

    World Suicide and Self Harm - World Health Organization (WHO)   Link


    Every year, almost one million people die from suicide; a "global" mortality, one death every 40 seconds.

     

    In the last 45 years suicide rates have increased by 60% worldwide. Suicide is among the three leading causes of death among those aged 15-44 years in some countries, and the second leading cause of death in the 10-24 years age group; these figures do not include suicide attempts which are up to 20 times more frequent than completed suicide.

     

    Although traditionally suicide rates have been highest among the male elderly, rates among young people have been increasing to such an extent that they are now the group at highest risk in a third of countries, in both developed and developing countries.

     

    Mental disorders (particularly depression and alcohol use disorders) are a major risk factor for suicide in Europe and North America; however, in Asian countries impulsiveness plays an important role. Suicide is complex with psychological, social, biological, cultural and environmental factors involved.

     

    WHO World Report on Violence and Health, Chapter 7, Self-directed violence.  Link

     

    Warning Signs of Suicide   save.org     Link

    • Ideation (thinking, talking or wishing about suicide)
    • Substance use or abuse (increased use or change in substance)
    • Puposelessness (no sense of purpose or belonging)
    • Anger
    • Trapped (feeling like there is no way out)
    • Hopelessness (there is nothing to live for, no hope or optimism)
    • Withdrawal (from family, friends, work, school, activities, hobbies)
    • Anxiety (restlessness, irritability, agitation)
    • Recklessness (high risk-taking behavior)
    • Mood disturbance (dramatic changes in mood)

     

    Additional Warning Signs of Suicide

    • Talking about suicide.
    • Looking for ways to die (internet searches for how to commit suicide, looking for guns, pills, etc.)
    • Statements about hopelessness, helplessness, or worthlessness.
    • Preoccupation with death.
    • Suddenly happier, calmer.
    • Loss of interest in things one cares about.
    • Visiting or calling people one cares about.
    • Making arrangements; setting one's affairs in order.
    • Giving things away, such as prized possessions.

    _________________________________________________________________________

    ____________________________________________________________________________

     

    Guns/Firearms in the U.S.

    Columns

    1) Year

    2) Nonfatal Firearm Incidents (NCVS) Link

    3) Nonfatal Firearm Victims (NCVS) Link

    4) Total Firearm Crimes (UCR) Link

    5) Murders With Firearms (UCR) Link

    6) Percent With Firearms (UCR) Link

    7) Suicide Deaths With Firearms (CDC) Link

    8) Percent of Suicides With Firearms (CDC) Link

    9) Unintentional Deaths With Firearms (CDC) Link

    10) Unintentional Nonfatal Injury With Firearms (CDC) Link

    11) NonFatal Injury With Firearms All Intents (CDC) Link  ***

    12) Percentage of CDC Nonfatal Injuries (Col. 11) compared to the NCVS Nonfatal Firearms Victims (Col. 3) (*)

    Total Yearly Firearm Deaths/Injuries in the U.S. (UCR & CDC). Columns 5, 7, 9, 11.

     

    1           2               3*              4                5             6               7       8           9       10         11*     12*      Total

            
    2003  366,840    449,150      347,705   11,041     66.9     16,907   53.70    730   18,941   65,834  14.66    94,512

    2004  280,890    331,330      338,587   10,650     66.0     16,750   51.64    649   16,555   64,389  19.44    92,438

    2005  419,640    477,110      368,178   11,351     68.0     17,002   52.10    789   15,388   69,825  14.64    98,967

    2006            **             **     388,891   11,566     67.9     16,833   50.55    642   14,678   71,417     N/A  100,458

    2007   348,910   394,580      385,178   11,512     68.0     17,352   50.16    613   15,698   69,68    17.66    99,160

    2008   303,880   343,550              N/A        N/A        N/A         N/A       N/A    N/A   17,215   78,622  22.89        N/A

    2009   323,090   352,810              N/A        N/A        N/A         N/A       N/A    N/A   18,610   66,769  18.93        N/A

     

    **Victimization rate trends excludes NCVS estimates for 2006 because of methodological inconsistencies between the data for that year and the data for other years. Changes to the NCVS and their impact upon the survey's estimates in 2006 are discussed in the Criminal Victimization, 2006 Technical Notes.

     

    ***Produced by: Office of Statistics and Programming, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, CDC
    Data Source: NEISS All Injury Program operated by the Consumer Product Safety Commission for numbers of injuries. Bureau of Census for population estimates.

     

    2009 NCVS Notes: 4.3 Million Violent Crimes. Link  352,810 victims with a firearm. NCVS does not include fatalites. Offenders used firearms to commit 8% of violent crime incidents in 2009. Firearms (28%) were the most common weapons used in robberies.  Link

     

    Number of Justifiable Homicides  Link

    FBI, Supplementary Homicide Reports, 1976-2005.

     

                           2000        2001        2002       2003         2004         2005

     

    By Police         309           378           341         371          368           343

    By Citizen       164           221           233         245          219           192

     

    Total               473           599           574         616          587           535

     

    Privately owned firearms in the U.S.: Approaching 300 million, including nearly 100 million handguns. The number of firearms rises over 4 million annually. Gun owners in the U.S.: 70-80 million; 40-45 million own handguns

    American households that have firearms: 40-45%.  Firearm Fact Card 2010. National Rifle Association of America, Institute for Legislative Action.  Link

     

    Each year firearms are used in more than 245,000 homicides worldwide (excluding war-torn countries). This statistic, however, is only a small percentage of all crimes committed with firearms, which are widely used to threaten and support other criminal acts. Interpol 2011.  Link

     

    There are an estimated 875 million small arms in circulation worldwide, produced by more than 1,000 companies from nearly 100 countries. All countries�and numerous non-state armed groups�procure small arms; the Small Arms Survey estimates that their annual authorized trade exceeds USD 6 billion. Small Arms Survey, Geneva, Switzerland.  Link

     

    Firearm deaths in America since 1968 when Dr. King and Robert Kennedy were assainated, 1,234,510. Child and teen firearm deaths since 1979, 107,603. Children and teens killed by firearms in 2006, 3,184.  Childrens Defence Fund 2009 Report.  Link

     

    In one year, guns murdered 17 people in Finland, 35 in Australia, 39 in England and Wales, 60 in Spain, 194 in Germany, 200 in Canada, and 9,484 in the United States.  Brady Campaign   Link

     

    A new study by the Government Accountability Office says most firearms recovered in drug violence in Mexico come from the U.S.  Wall Street Journal 06.09  Link

     

    Other Links

     

    National Rifle Association (NRA)            Violence Policy Center (VPC)

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    The Abortion, Sex and Pregnancy in the U.S.

    Columns

    1) Year

    2) Number of legal abortions in the U.S. (Guttmacher Institute) guttmacher.org

    3) Rape/Sexual Assault. Number of Victimizations (NCVS) U.S.

    4) Number of Intimate Partner Violence Victims (NCVS) U.S.

    5) Percentage of Intimate Partner Violence Victims that were Women (NCVS) U.S.

    6) Cases of Sexually Transmitted Diseases by State Health Departments, Syphilis, Chlamydia,Gonerrhea. (avert.org) U.S.

    7) Aids Diagnoses By Year (aver.og) U.S.

     

      1            2                  3              4                5           6                   7

     

    2003   1,312,790       198,850      N/A                     1,246,871        N/A

    2004   1,222,100       209,880      N/A                     1,293,017        N/A

    2005   1,206,200       190,600      N/A                     1,349,326     38,227

    2006   1,262,200       272,350      N/A                     1,411,323     37,296

    2007   1,209,640      248,280    623,360    89%    1,430,202     37,154

    2008   1,212,350      203,830    593,100    85%    1,593,556     37,991

    2009     N/A              125,910    655,300    82%    1,590,182        N/A

     

    Sex Attacks

    9 of every 10 rape victims were female (NCVS 2003). U.S.

    1 out of every 6 American women has been the victim of an attempted or completed rape in her lifetime (14.8% completed rape; 2.8% attempted rape) (National Institute of Justice & Centers for Disease Control & Prevention. Prevalence, Incidence and Consequences of Violence Against Women Survey. 1998). ncjrs.gov

    Worldwide, one in five women will become a victim of rape or attempted rape in her lifetime. un.org

    15% of sexual assault and rape victims are under age 12 (NCVS 2004). U.S.

    Up to 70 per cent of women experience violence in their lifetime. un.org

     

    Child Sex Trade

    Commercial sexual exploitation of children is a clandestine scourge, so accurate statistics are hard to come by. Because children are frequently shuttled through underground networks of traffickers, most sexual exploitation of children never comes to the attention of government authorities. In many countries, it is not even recognized as a problem. Nevertheless, it is estimated that approximately one million children (mainly girls) enter the multi-billion dollar commercial sex trade every year. As the following estimates reveal, this is a global issue:

    Children and women subjected to commercial sexual exploitation: unicef.org  2001

    100,000 in the Philippines
    400,000 in India
    100,000 in Taiwan
    200,000 in Thailand
    244,000-325,000 in the United States
    100,000 in Brazil
    35,000 in West Africa
    175,000 in Eastern & Central Europe

     

    Maternal Mortality

    In 2005, there were an estimated 536 000 maternal deaths worldwide. World Health Organization

    Every day, more than 1,000 women die in pregnancy or childbirth. Evidence shows that infants whose mothers die are more likely to die before reaching their second birthday than infants whose mothers survive. And for every woman who dies, 20 or more experience serious complications. unfpa.org

     

    Infant Mortality

    2011 Estimate Total: 41.61 deaths/1,000 live births. cia.gov

    World Vital Events Per Time Unit: 2011 -132,697,074 Births Per Year. census.gov

    5,521,525 Infant Deaths Estimated in 2011. wav.org estimate.
    Some 2.6 million stillbirths occurred worldwide in 2009, according to the first comprehensive set of estimates published in a special series of The Lancet. Every day more than 7200 babies are stillborn. Who Sexual and Reproductive Health April 14, 2011

     

    Abortions

    Nearly half of pregnancies among American women are unintended, and four in 10 of these are terminated by abortion. Eighty-eight percent of abortions occur in the first 12 weeks of pregnancy, 2006. Twenty-two percent of all pregnancies (excluding miscarriages) end in abortion. 

    From 1973 through 2008, nearly 50 million legal abortions occurred.

    guttmacher.org  January 2011 Fact Sheet

    Approximately 42 million pregnancies are voluntarily terminated each year - 22 million within the national legal system and 20 million out side it.  WHO 2003 Unsafe Abortion Report

     

    Unsafe Abortions

    The World Health Organization defines unsafe abortion as a procedure for terminating an unintended pregnancy carried out either by persons lacking the necessary skills or in an environment that does not conform to minimal medical standards, or both. Worldwide, 48% of all induced abortions are unsafe. However, in developed regions, nearly all abortions (92%) are safe, whereas in developing countries, more than half (55%) are unsafe.

    21.6 million unsafe abortions occurred in 2008. Between 2003 and 2008, the global unsafe abortion rate was unchanged at 14 per 1,000 women aged 15-44 years. More than 95% of abortions in Africa and Latin America are performed under unsafe circumstances, as are about 60% of abortions in Asia (excluding Eastern Asia). guttmacher.org February 2011 Fact Sheet

     

    Consequences of Unsafe Abortions For Women

    Worldwide, an estimated five million women are hospitalized each year for treatment of abortion-related complications, such as hemorrhage and sepsis. Complications due to unsafe abortion procedures account for an estimated 13% of maternal deaths worldwide, or 47,000 per year. Almost all abortion-related deaths occur in developing countries. The highest number occur in Africa. Additional consequences of unsafe abortion include loss of productivity, economic burden on public health systems,stigma and long-term health problems, such as infertility. guttmacher.org February 2011 Fact Sheet

    Samples of Unsafe Abortions Used: Drinking turpentine, bleach or black tea with livestock manure, Inserting herbal preparations into the vagina or cervix. Placing foreign bodies, such a stick, coat hanger or chicken bone into the uterus, jumping from the top of the stairs or a roof. Approximately 220,000 children worldwide lose their mothers every year from abortion-related deaths. Facts on Inducing Abortions Worldwide 2007 Guttmacher/Who

    A woman dies every eight minutes somewhere in a developing country due to complications arising from a unsafe abortion. who.int

     

    Contraception and Women

    The average woman must use some form of effective contraception for at least 20 years if she wants to limit her family size to two children, and 16 years if she wants four children. Some 82% of unintended pregnancies in developing countries occur among women who have an unmet need for modern contraceptives; women using modern contraceptives account for only 18% of unintended pregnancies. guttmacher.org February 2011 Fact Sheet

     

     

    News

     

    New Guttmacher research finds that abortion rates declined among most groups of women between 2000 and 2008, with the notable exception of poor women. 05.11  Link

    Other Links

     

    National Right to Life              Planned Parenthood         Birthright International

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